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September 15, 2005

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kim

Sounds like Brown's a victim, too, but it also sounds like he was standing in Katrina's path.
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kim

Give him his Hero Medal of Presidential Honorable Mention and get him out to stud. He tried, but is not a mudder.
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Syl

"The most responsive person he could find, Mr. Brown said, was Governor Blanco's husband, Raymond."

Ouch.

Jerkweed

FEMA is yesterdays news-all they're good for now is an automatic $2,000 check. Got mine yesterday. Thanks fellow taxpayers.

Louisiana officials-reviled by one and all.

Meanwhile-the real villain down here is another alphabetical tentacle of Leviathan-the ACE and its monstrous offspring the MRGO.

These are the acronyms in dispute for the future believe me.

Syl

Bush, without fanfare, and very simply, stated he took full reponsibility for failures in the federal response.

When you have a true leader, others follow. And Blanco did.

I could be snarky and cynical about this, but I choose not to.

Bush's simple statement changes the narrative and lets the healing begin.

That's we expect from a leader, and that's what we got.

TexasToast

Now everybody wants to be the hero who takes responsibility!

I'm Sparticus!

Jerkweed

"Bush...stated he took full reponsibility for failures in the federal response."

Especially Odd. Since right-wing blogs argued for two weeks there were no failures in the federal response.

Po Boy

TM-you left out the best quote:

"Mr. Brown acknowledged that he had been criticized for not ordering a complete evacuation or calling in federal troops sooner. But he said the storm made it hard to communicate and assess the situation.

"Until you have been there," he said, "you don't realize it is the middle of a hurricane."

At least Mr. Brown made me laugh just once.

Ranger

On the issue of Presidents taking responsibility, the last time I think I saw a real example of this was Reagan over the Beirut Barracks bombing. On the morning that a report was going to be released that specifically blamed several members of the local chain of command for numerous incidents of bad judgment, Reagan came out and took personal responsibility for the failures that led to the bomber getting close enough to destroy the building because he had ordered the Marines into Lebanon an put them in harms way.

Steve

TM
"Well, fine, the locals were inept. But doesn't that mean that the White House needed to fill the leadership void?"

No.

Local elections are supposed to determine leadership. We have to keep the heat on the local officials, the electorate, and the actions of individuals who chose to ignore the evacuation orders, or our federal, republican system is lost. We are on the verge of throwing out the "Personal responsibility" and federalism babies with the bathwater.

Ted Kennedy and Jesse Jackson are smiling a little wider since Katrina struck.
-Steve

Po Boy

Of course-Reagan invaded Grenada two days later-so it was kind of overshadowed.

Les Nessman

"Since right-wing blogs argued for two weeks there were no failures in the federal response."

Do you have an example of a right-wing blog that did that?

Harry Arthur

Brown can dodge his responsibility any way he wants but a true leader, seeing that things aren't going in the correct direction, doesn't call his superiors to beg for help, he takes command if necessary and starts making things happen on his own. It seems to me Brown admits that he didn't do that.

It also seems to me, admittedly without having read the NYT interview, that he was in just as far over his head as was the LA governor. As I have stated previously, you don't have to be an emergency management expert to run FEMA, you just have to have management and leadership skills and know enough to ask your staff to make you smart on what the agency can do, what it can't do and what it's supposed to do. I don't see any evidence of any of that taking place on Mr Brown's watch and it appears from what I've read so far of the interview that he is at least honest enough to admit some of that.

Leaders do not wait for things to happen - they make things happen. Mr Brown and the LA government, it seems to me, are "waiters" not "makers". This is why the military operation was such a stark contrast with the state and FEMA responses. Military leaders are used to making things happen and once they were in NO they did.

I trust Bush has looked for a leader for FEMA this time around. It's fine to promote your friends if they can do the job, after all, you know and trust them. But when your friends aren't leaders then they have no place at the levels of responsibility that call for leadership. It's more clear the more we hear that Bush didn't choose well on this one. I won't apologize for him but, heck even Ted Williams made six outs for every four hits. This was apparently one of his "outs".

TM

Ok, clue-followers - "MRGO" is the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet; ACE is, hmm, an insurance company?

Po Boy

Army Core of Engineers.

Po Boy

Excuse me, its Corps-as in corps(es)

DaraLundy

Did Mississippi have trouble coming up with detailed lists? The lower third of the state was flattened. The New York Times does not appear to have asked that question.

Jerkweed

How about this beaut Nessman:

Powerline 9/2/05: "New Orleans and its residents owe the President a profound debt of gratitude."

So I suppose Bush's speech tonight will be a quick three-worder: "You are welcome." Right?

Po Boy

Read this Wapo story for a primer. It's way too soft on the ACE but it's a start.

Po Boy

Jerkweed is totally right btw. The people of St. Bernard Parish (the Parish SE of N.O) are wiped out far worse than New Orleanians and even Mississippians.

They're like New Orleanians in that they are flooded out and like Mississippians in that their houses are completely gone-but unlike either-officials are now telling them don't expect to get back in the Parish before next summer, if then. Some of these folks are facing the fact that even the bank in which they had their safety deposit box is, uh, not there.

And these people have been screaming to have the MRGO-(an unnecessary little used navigation canal and the posterboy government boondoggle funded by the US taxpayer-closed for years). Literally years. They knew it would kill them.

The MRGO screwed them (and New Orleans in turn) in two ways-1. it was a highway for the storm surge right into the heart of parish 2. the wetland erosion caused by the MRGO (primarily through salt water intrusion) ensured the storm surge would not be dampened. (The quick and dirty formula=storm surge drops one foot for every mile of marsh it travels over).

Steve

Guys, when the feds send "aid" to bailout folks from their own poor choices we wind up rewarding the poor choices.

Delta, United, and Northwest airlines have declared Chapter 11 bankruptcy. How many billions of dollars have the American taxpayers wasted in a futile attempt to forestall their fate?

NO's sunken, corrupt city is no different from the union-run United Airlines - bankrupt and a drag on the greater society.
Let's cut our losses, and learn from our past mistakes.
-Steve

Po Boy

"Let's cut our losses, and learn from our past mistakes."

Probably too early to impeach Bush, but I'm game if you are.

Ontario Emperor

For those who demand that Brown show instant leadership, should he have sent Landreneau directly to Abu Gharib? At least Brown tried; there's no evidence that Landreneau did anything.

Strick

Brown had no responsibility to ask for Federal troops in this. The Governor was the only with one with that authority and she had to specifically ask for them. This isn't like bottles of water or MREs, there's are huge issues with using active forces domestically.

CNN tells us she didn't even think about requesting troops until it was clear New Orleans was out of control and the National Guard she had raised to that point weren't able to deal with it. Then Nagin tells us that the next day when Bush gave her two options for getting the troops, and, in the middle of the crisis, she asked for 24 hours to think about it which way he should respond to her request. Not state leadership's finest moment.

It doesn't sound like Brown distiquished himself down there though. Honore had no trouble getting things moving. No doubt about that.

Po Boy

You guys are still thinking small.

People in Louisiana really dont care anymore about casting blame for the three-four days after the hurricane. Everybody's got dry clothes on now.

What we're into is laying blame for the whole goddamn flooding enchilida.

This is a whole new ballgame.

Steven J.

Dd it occur to anyone on Blanco's staff that hurricane response was a responsibility of the governor?

Does this count?

Presenter: Gen. Russel Honoré, commander, Joint Task Force Katrina

Thursday, September 1, 2005
http://www.dod.gov/transcripts/2005/tr20050901-3843.html

Q General, Jamie McIntyre from CNN. To what extent is this additional assistance you've outlined today a response to a request from the state governors in Louisiana, Mississippi? And if so, can you tell us when specifically you got that request?

GEN. HONORÉ: Yes, sir. The process starts, sir, in this particular event, with a request Friday of last week, as the approximate date for defense coordinating offices to be established in Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. Those were established in those states over Friday and Saturday.

Steven J.

Or was it their belief that FEMA would position their own officials around the state with their own secure communications in order to accommodate a collapse in the governor's office?

This is EXACTLY what FEMA should've done and should be prepared to do. A terrorist attack is likely to deliberately knock out communications.

TM

So ACE is Army Corpses of Engineers? D'oh!

I never had a prayer with my second guess.

Anyway, if we have moved on to bitter recriminations, I did hear on the radio that the Spartacus at the ACE admits that they should have pre-positioned sandbags and choppers in anticipation of a need to repair levees.

In other news, the RNC admits that they should have pre-positioned windbags to present a better White House spin.

Sorry. On the assertion that "right-wing blogs argued for two weeks there were no failures in the federal response", my casual impression is that lefty blogs noted that there were failures at all levels and then killed Bush and the feds; righty blogs noted that there were failures at all levels and then killed Nagin and Blanco; and the national media leaned towards the lefty blog approach.

Po Boy

Not me. I blast all three levels at once. I detest everyone equally.

Hell, I looked up my old student body president and chewed his ass out for good measure.

Harry Arthur

For those who demand that Brown show instant leadership, yes I'm one who demands that when appointed to head a federal agency you be ready to show leadership on a moment's notice. I'd be willing to cut him some slack if he had assumed control of FEMA in the last two weeks but he's had adequate time to do his homework and there's no evidence that he did so.

Brown had no responsibility to ask for Federal troops in this, true but irrelevant. Brown had an "obligation" when he saw things "going to hell in a handbasket" to either assume control of the situation and start making decisions or to talk very fast and pursuasively to get others who did have the "official" responsibility to assume those responsibilities and make appropriate decisions.

Crying to your chain of command about things you can't get done and asking your chain of command to "take over" because you're ineffective is evidence of a complete absense of leadership skills. If Brown was an infantry platoon leader and reacted to the fog of battle in this manner, he would get himself and his men killed very quickly. Failure to lead has consequences.

Contrast this with the following: While the general did not have responsibility for the entire relief effort and the Guard, his commanding manner helped mobilize the state's efforts. In other words, he saw what needed to be done and by force of "his manner" got it done. That's what leaders do. The general didn't whine about not having the authority or the correct paperwork to effect action he just waded into the fray and made things happen. And it doesn't take a military uniform to have a "commanding manner".

Everything else we're discussing here about who had authority to do what and whether the governor requested the right solutions are pathetic excuses for not knowing how to get things done and not trying hard enough. If the governor didn't know what to ask for, Brown should have told her and insisted that he be of assistance. Bureaucratic paper-pushing and bean-counting won't ever be the solution in emergency situations. It certainly wasn't here.

PB, I believe you're right. The voters will deal with the state officials. Brown has resigned (so he wouldn't be fired as he deserved to be), and we will have a public commission to detail errors and to recommend corrective actions.

TexasToast

....we will have a public commission to detail errors and to recommend corrective actions.

That was voted down on a straight party line vote. The R's want to investigate themselves.

kim

ACE no doubt will come in for a disproportionate share of blame. I say disproportionate because it seems they've been tasked with an impossibility, that is defend south east Louisiana against Cat 5 storms with Cat 3 resources, funding, and devices.

How much will it cost to protect what part of the the Gulf Coast against Cat 5 nature?


I've long pondered the mystery of farmable land so far out in the Bay of Bengal that, despite government fiat against it, gets populated and devastated in predictable cycles. There is another similar area in the Saharan south that gets populated every rainy cycle and suffers mass starvation when the predictable drought returns in cycle. There are valleys in China that flood disastrously, and predictably.

Must we have such an area? Or can we see far enough ahead to the next Cat 5.
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kim

Perhaps we'll come out with a new calculus of recovery. I've read that the Egyptians developed math to facilitate recovery from seasonal flooding.

They used it to remark field boundaries erased by flooding.
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Po Boy

"ACE no doubt will come in for a disproportionate share of blame. I say disproportionate because it seems they've been tasked with an impossibility, that is defend south east Louisiana against Cat 5 storms with Cat 3 resources, funding, and devices."

No Kim-they will get all the blame they richly deserve. For one thing it wasn't a Cat 5 at landfall. Second, New Orleans wasn't really "hit". Note they were plucking people off roofs. With a direct hit-there would be no roofs left. The strongest winds were well to th east of N.O., as you can see by the Mississippi coast.

In effect-it was a Cat 3 in N.O. that shot through their class 3 levees. That's a major deal.

Nor is it impossible to defend new Orleans even from a Class 5. But it's not levees. It's restoration of the vast South Louisiana wetlands and barrier islands that can do it.

And Bush is turning on a Cat 5 funding effort. Even I'm saying slow down a little.
If we don't plan it right-it will all be wasted. Hell, they ought to just have a Mardi Gras parade and throw out $100 bills instead of beads.

Po Boy

"Must we have such an area? Or can we see far enough ahead to the next Cat 5."

And if it's an area that shouldn't be rebuilt-it's the Mississippi Gulf Coast. They were already wiped out by Camille in 1969 and cannot be protected at all.

Harry Arthur

TT, quite frankly I don't care whether it's a public commission or public congressional hearings. The truth will come out. I believe the democrats will either be given appropriate investigative capabilities, e.g., subpena (sorry for the spelling) powers and adequate staff, or they'll force a public commission. In either case everyone will have a part and the light will shine on the facts.

Remember, the 9/11 commission was voted down before it became a reality also, though it took a year. This isn't decided just quite yet. Hopefully (I'm so naive) we can avoid partisan politics from both sides. In all honesty, I thought the 9/11 commission was too partison so we'll see if we can do better this time.

Personally, if I were Bush, I'd appoint John Breaux chairman of an independent commission and give him cart blanche to pick the members. My only guidance would be that they represent fair-minded citizens without any particular axe to grind. Ideally there would be experts in various engineering and emergency response disciplines but no one directly involved over the years with NO flood control or emergency response planning.

kim

Yes, I understand it was Cat 4 at landfall, and that it turned at the last minute. Where did that blast of high, dry air come from?

And it was Cat 4 storm surge that ultimately took you out. That and an imperfect Cat 3 dyke.

I'll grow extra tits for $100 dollar bills.
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millco88

Slow down? You never slow a bureuacracy down if you ever want it to start up again. Inertia dominates the thinking. But if someone in LA govt doesn't have a "solution" already worked up, then what have they been doing? Wait, don't answer that.

Po Boy

"And it was Cat 4 storm surge..."

Sorry to keep backing you down many nipples-but it was a Cat 4 storm surge that wiped out St. Bernard (see above for ACE's role in that) but that would have lessened to a Cat 3 storm surge by the time it rolled in to N.O. just by virtue of the amount of land it was spreading over.

These aren't final numbers-but this is the current thinking round here.

New Orleans is not on the coast. Though it's a little closer to open water than it was two weeks ago.

kim

Has anyone explored tactical nuclear weapons or some other exotic energy device to disrupt eyewalls?

And given enough time, the Mississippi River will eventually extend the delta far enough out that New Orleans will no longer be threatened by hurricanes. Of course, by then it will be silted in.

Barrier islands and wetlands are intriguing as protection. The problems remains: we get in trouble when we can build where we shouldn't.

I think, as do you, that reconstruction should be very carefully thought out. I'm sorry to report that I doubt that it will be.
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Harry Arthur

PB, It's restoration of the vast South Louisiana wetlands and barrier islands that can do it.

And Bush is turning on a Cat 5 funding effort. Even I'm saying slow down a little.
If we don't plan it right-it will all be wasted. Hell, they ought to just have a Mardi Gras parade and throw out $100 bills instead of beads.

Exactly! It's the marshes and the natural barrier islands that do the job. They are a natural defense against virtually any level of storm. Amazingly we think we're smarter than nature's design. Levees may be helpful in some applications but in the main they just focus the surge.

As for spending. Couldn't agree more also. Look at the last major storm to hit FL. FEMA handed out millions to people who weren't even affected in, if I remember correctly, Dade county. Could have the location wrong but there was unquestionable documented waste for which FEMA was rightly criiticized. It's that leadership thing again.

kim

The Cat 4 storm surge filled Lake Pontchartrain, which then poured into New Orleans. I'm hesitant to yield anymore nipples because you are native and know what you are talking about.
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kim

I even wonder, Po Boy, if the last minute turn eastwards didn't pour more of the storm surge fury into Lake Pontchartrain than if Katrina had stayed on its course and hit New Orleans directly? Any hydrologists around to guess at that one?

The turn just pointed the gulf waters at Lake Pontchartrain. I'm guessing, any one really understand the dynamics here?
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Harry Arthur

kim, I'm may be dead wrong, as in backwards, but my understanding of the storm surge is that the worst is on the NE side of the eye. In this case that was focused on MS. I believe it is focused by the rotation of winds in the storm.

PB? I'm ready to be educated.

kim

Yes, I see, and my point is that the turn focussed more of the NE edge on Lake Pontchartrain, and also Mississippi. But I'm not at all sure of that.
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kim

Why are we arguing about this? Well to belabor a point obvious to some, the cost of protection against increasing categories rises exponentially. Where and if that money is to be spent is a trillion dollar question.
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kim

More likely multi-trillion dollar question.

What you'll Cat 5 New Orleans and not South Carolina?
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TexasToast

Actually Kim, eventually the Mississippi will break through at the Old River Control Structure and the Atchafalaya will become the Mississippi. The Atchafalaya has already captured the Red River and 30% of the Mississippi. It’s a matter of time. New Orleans will have too little water instead of too much.

There have been ongoing projects to restore the delta and the barrier islands - all defunded as of late. I'm curious what GWB will have to say about that.

Harry

The reason the 9/11 Commission seemed "political" is because it challenged the conventional wisdom - in a way that the Senate Committee on Intelligence did not. Remember the promised second part of the promised Senate Committee investigation – Didn’t think so – it never happened and never will. ISTM that if there ever was a time to challenge the conventional wisdom, a catastrophic failure of government like this debacle is the time. The democrats should refuse to participate in this “bi-partisan” sham.

kim

You would guess, TT from the distribution of hydrocarbon deposits, that the Mississippi is presently nearer the eastern edge of its historical outlet than the central, or western part.
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TexasToast

http://users.stlcc.edu/jangert/oldriver/oldriver.html "> Old River . Matter of time.

kim

John McPhee, The Control of Nature. Thanks, I'm off.
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kim

John McPhee, The Control of Nature. Thanks, I'm off.

I'm back. He has battles with nature that we have some chance with, and more deliberate choice to engage. The Bengalese, the Saharans, the Chinese, haven't a chance, and little choice but to move to doomed areas or starve. Maybe he could get his next Pulitzer looking at them.
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cathyf
Nor is it impossible to defend new Orleans even from a Class 5. But it's not levees. It's restoration of the vast South Louisiana wetlands and barrier islands that can do it.

Not. Gonna. Happen.

It's an either-or choice. Either allow the river to break up into a gazillion creek-sized trickles at the north end of the delta, washing its silt down into a thriving delta. And regularly flood New Orleans with a natural river flood and start silting it back up to sea level. Or force it to stay in a single, large, navigable, deep-water channel. To survive, the delta needs all of the river's water to bring the silt to replenish what the gulf takes away. To be navigable, the ships need all of the river's water to be in a highly artificial single channel. From what I have seen, the only positive thing that has happened to the delta ecology was in 1927 when they dynamited the levees to protect New Orleans from Mississippi River flooding. Of course that wasn't particularly healthy for the delta's 2-legged inhabitants...

So, if it comes down to a choice between one small city being able to stay where it is, or the United States being able to export corn and soybeans, who do you think is gonna win? It looks to me like the US decided to sacrifice New Orleans to river shipping at least a century ago, and it just took a long time for mother nature to get around to executing its death warrent.

cathy :-)

TexasToast

">http://www.newyorker.com/talk/content/articles/050912ta_talk_mcphee"> John McPhee in the New Yorker.

kim

Ironic that what built it doomed it.

I'll take a Shiva Supreme with that Blame Burrito.
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Roland Patrick

'He said he did not ask for federal active-duty troops to be deployed because he assumed his superiors in Washington were doing all they could.'

Legally.

Brown talks like he knows he doesn't really have the authority to give orders without the governor's asking him to do so through the President. Which is why Brown was calling the White House to ask the President to call and nudge her and the Mayor.

Brownie, contrary to claims made by the mainstream media, had been through this drill before. In Florida, 2004, four times within a few weeks. He has to work with state and local authorities; it's the law.

Harry Arthur

Tex, ISTM that if there ever was a time to challenge the conventional wisdom, a catastrophic failure of government like this debacle is the time. I agree. I'm guessing we'll have a commission whether the republicans like it or not. I still like my idea posted above. I think Breaux would lend credibility to any investigation, unless (like Jamie Gorelick) he was part of the problem.

PB, what do you folks in LA think about Breaux? I would think he'd make a good governor - he seems like a very reasonable, moderate sort of guy.

Harry Arthur

Roland, I'm not suggesting he violate the law. I'm suggesting that a leader will get things done because they inspire confidence and thereby people listen to and follow them or at the very least follow their good counsel. My example was Gen Honore.

Don't know if the article was "spin" but leaders get things done. To paraphrase Ronald Reagan, "Mr Brown, I know leaders, I've seen leaders lead up close and personal, I've been a leader, and Mr Brown, you're no leader."

Syl

TT

"a catastrophic failure of government like this debacle"

Well, I'm not sure about the catastrophic part when considering a period of three or four days compared to nature and a century's time.

There were failures, we should note them, but for most (certainly not all) of the people caught up in those four days it was more discomfort than tragedy.

I guess, like po boy, the larger picture is growing more important to me.

PS I like Breaux.

Les Nessman

jerkweed

You still haven't shown any examples of "right-wing blogs argued for two weeks there were no failures in the federal response."

because there weren't any right wing blogs that said there were * NO * failures.


btw, Powerline, Sep 9:
"The tragic events along the Gulf Coast offer us the opportunity to identify and (to the extent possible) iron out problems within the relevant federal bureaucracies."

boris

To paraphrase Ronald Reagan

Don't know if RR ever said something like that, but I remember Loyd Bentsen using a similar line on Dan Quayle during a VP debate.

Syl

I'm sorry. My 'discomfort' post came off as terribly callous. I was only speaking of the extra delay getting them fed and evacuated. Not dismissing the hell of losing everything.

Harry Arthur

My recollection, though admittedly foggy and perhaps a figment of my imagination was that Reagan made a quip something like: "I knew Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson was a friend of mine, and you're no Thomas Jefferson." It was the age issue in the 1984 campaign against Mondale that probably generated this one. The other one was in a debate with Mondale where he promised not to exploit the "youth and inexperience of his opponent" that caused even Mondale to laugh.

I believe Bentsen stole the quote from Reagan and applied it to himself and John Kennedy to humiliate Quayle who had been compared to a young Jack Kennedy by some.

I've probably been a little too tough on Mr Brown but reading his interview leads me to believe that he really doesn't understand his leadership failure. It doesn't mean he's a bad person. I know many nice, well meaning people who aren't leaders. Some of them I would follow only to see what they were up to. But good intentions do not an effective FEMA director make.

Any comments on Bush's speech tonight? PB, what do you think? I was reminded in the commentary after the speech that congressman Bob Livingston should probably co-chair a commission with Breaux. It may very well be that the cabinet can investigate itself and the congress can investigate as well but I'm largely in agreement with TT that at a minimum both create at least an appearance of a conflict of interest no matter how sincere the participants. It's just human nature.

Larry Hayes

I recall that Kennedy made a statement, but I can't be fully sure of the details. As I recall, he said first "success has many fathers, but defeat is an orphan" and then said "I am solely responsible" for the Bay of Pigs failure.

Roland Patrick

The, 'I knew X. X was a friend of mine, and you're no X' line was originated by Lloyd Bentsen in the 1988 VP debates.

Reagan took it and turned against the Democrats at the 1992 Republican convention:

'This fellow they've nominated claims he's the new Thomas Jefferson. Well, let me tell you something. I knew Thomas Jefferson. He was a friend of mine. And governor, you're no Thomas Jefferson.'

Harry Arthur

Roland, makes sense. Thanks. As HAL said, "my mind is going ..."

Roland Patrick

'I've probably been a little too tough on Mr Brown but reading his interview leads me to believe that he really doesn't understand his leadership failure.'

First, he's outranked within Louisiana by the Governor. If he failed to convince her to do some things that would seem to be a failure to persuade, rather than a leadership failure. Now, if you had some evidence he couldn't get his own FEMA employees to do what he wanted, that would be another matter, but I'm unaware of any examples.

Second he did convince Mayor Nagin to call for an evacuation. Is that good?

Keeping in mind that the normal outcome of a hurricane is destruction, suffering and death, how do we know that anyone else could do better?

Po Boy

Mr. Patrick-nobody cares about Brown anymore so I wont go into prolonged length. But look-on Tuesday-the day after the storm-the guy was wearing a well pressed white Oxford shirt with nary a stain on it.

Now-I can't prove it-but I can virtually guarantee you that he was the only able bodied man anywhere in the hurricane impacted region to be wearing an unstained starched Oxford the day after that storm. He might as well have spraypainted "I AINT BEEN DOING SHIT" on his forehead.

You cant always judge a man by his clothes, but in this case...

boris

wearing a well pressed white Oxford shirt with nary a stain

This was his actual failing. He failed to look like he was accomplishing anything. If only he had gone on TV with a dirty shirt!

One wonders how one's shirt gets dirty from operating a radio and advising politicians.

kim

Bush's shirt was clean the other night. For shame.
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Richard

Anyone remember how Clinton responded when asked about the WACO incident? I do, "oh, ha ha, that was Reno's deal over there, ha ha!" Lovely!

kim

Speaking sartorially, you know that Koresh donned a charcoal blazer for that little getogether.
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boris

The barbeque?

kim

Throw a couple more Barbies on the barbie.
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