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October 22, 2006

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» Disgraceful from My Dogs are Smarter
Thanks, Byron. I for one, however, would have appreciated the attack of conscience before you all decided to publish the piece, not after several months of soul-searching. Don't get me wrong; it's nice that you have a conscience of course, but it'... [Read More]

» Mad at George Bush? Get even, give away our intelligence secrets from Squiggler
Or so says Ombudsman Bryan Calame at the New York Times. Michelle Malkin calls it Un. Freaking. Believable! It really is, isn't it? The arrogance is mindboggling. What the heck are you talking about Sara? Remember the Swift Program designed to monitor ... [Read More]

» Byron Calame Should Resign from Patterico's Pontifications
Byron Calame, the public editor of the New York Times, admits today that the paper made a mistake when it decided to run the Swift terrorist finance tracking story. (Via Michelle Malkin.) Calame had previously defended the decision in a column that, ... [Read More]

» I hated Bush so much I couldnt do my job from The Anchoress
That would be NY Times Public Editor (used to be called ombudsman) Brian Calame as he makes excuses for a much-too-late admission of malicious journalism. He writes: My July 2 column strongly supported The Times’s decision to publish i... [Read More]

» NYTimes editor now admits: We were wrong to blab from Michelle Malkin
Photoshop: Bob D. Un. Freaking. Believable. The NYTimes ombudsman, Byron Calame, buried a bombshell mea culpa in his column today--reversing his prior defense of the Times' blabbermouth report on a once-secret terrorist banking data surveillance progr... [Read More]

» NYT public editor Byron Calame now admits paper was wrong to publish info on banking-data surveillance program (aka SWIFT) from Sister Toldjah
Patterico thinks Calame, whose admission is published here, should resign. While I can understand the sentiment behind Pattericos call, its going to take a lot more changes at the NYT besides a potential Calame resignation to get them t... [Read More]

» Resign, hell! Fetch a rope. from Bill's Bites
NYT's Calame: Oops. Our Bad.Ed Morrissey The New York Times' public editor, Byron Calame, initially supported the publication of the confidential national-security program that tracked terrorist financing through the Swift banking program. Now, at the ... [Read More]

» http://instapundit.com/archives/033434.php from Instapundit.com
MORE ON THE NEW YORK TIMES' SWIFT FLIPFLOP, from Tom Maguire ("Toothpaste, meet tube") and Bill Quick: "This is an especially telling admission from the Times 'ombudsman,' who, in theory at least, is supposed to be the most objective journalist in the ... [Read More]

» Belated realizations from Kent's Imperative
The damage having been done, this admission garners the American public nothing. Introspection in the face of monumental arrogance is by no means commendable. The Times took upon itself a decision.... [Read More]

» Peas In A Pod from Joust The Facts
Why, the BBC and the New York Times, of course. (props to Ace of Spades) First, the BBC. At the secret meeting in London last month, which was hosted by veteran broadcaster Sue Lawley, BBC executives admitted the corporation is [Read More]

» Bush Made Me Do It from Flopping Aces
The first thought that popped into my head when I read this non-apology was the scene where Gilda Radners Emily Litella apologizes to Jane Curtin.well sort of: Bookmark to: ... [Read More]

» NY Times Editor Admits Was Wrong to Disclose Bank Data Surveillance Program from GINA COBB
A New York Times public editor, Byron Calame, has admitted -- very belatedly, and to late to correct the harm that the New York Times has done -- that the New York Times was wrong to disclose the secret SWIFT international funds transfer surveillance p... [Read More]

» NYT Ombudsman Decides, 'All Right, Maybe We Shouldn't Have Run the SWIFT Story' from Mary Katharine Ham
Here's Byron Calame: My July 2 column strongly supported The Times’s decision to publish its June 23 article on a once-secret banking-data surveillance program. After pondering for several months, I have decided I was off base. There were reasons... [Read More]

» Well, Duh! from Decision '08
The MinuteMan catches NY Times Public Editor Byron Calame admitting the revelation of the SWIFT anti-terrorism banking initiative was a mistake: Byron Calame, NY Times Public Editor, has changed his mind and now believes that the disclosure of the SWIF... [Read More]

Comments

Jane

What a joke - blinded by BDS Calame admits he cannot do his job. Like that's a big surprise. Sheesh!

Rick Ballard

"I fear I allowed the vicious criticism of The Times by the Bush administration to trigger my instinctive affinity for the underdog and enduring faith in a free press — two traits that I warned readers about in my first column."

And oh, by the way, would someone please fix the small problem with the public treating the Times like a plague ship? Otherwise I'll lose this phoney baloney job and who'll stand up for treason if we don't, anyway?

Remember Comrades - the future belongs to the masses and only we at the Times are competent to lead them.

Sincerely,

Commissar Calame

Patrick R. Sullivan

'the vicious criticism of The Times by the Bush administration'

What a wuss.

arrowhead

What kept me from seeing these matters more clearly earlier in what admittedly was a close call? I fear I allowed the vicious criticism of The Times by the Bush administration to trigger my instinctive affinity for the underdog and enduring faith in a free press..."

What conceited tripe!

If he was wrong, as he seems to admit ("Those two factors are really what bring me to this corrective commentary: the apparent legality of the program in the United States, and the absence of any evidence that anyone’s private data had actually been misused."), then why insist that printing the story was a close call?

That the NYT would choose to print a critical news article that discloses classified information during wartime based on the level of criticism that its organization receives reveals the petty depths to which that institution has descended - not to mention its out and out "seditious" bent.

Sara (Squiggler)

I just finished posting on this story and I am so angry, I am still shaking. The arrogance of this is mindboggling. I want these guys prosecuted, if there is any justice, it would happen, but I won't hold my breath.

Daddy

"An instinctive affinity for the underdog..."
Mr Calame wouldn't know an underdog if it bit him in the ass. Calame's calumny, and that of his cohorts in the free press of this country, has been to savagly lie, distort and damage the reputation of this President since day 1. In regards to truth, decency and getting an honest shake from the media I can think of no greater underdog on the planet than the Bush Administration. At least today the BBC and now this guy sort of admit it. Who's next?

PeterUK

This comes into the category of "Sorry I was angry about the mess made when I ran over your dog,but it was on my driveway".

clarice

Let's invite Calame for tea at JOM. Perhaps he might benefit from a day outside the bubble.

PeterUK

Good idea Clarice,could do a little JOM product testing.

clarice

I'll make the scones.

Jane

I'll bring the vodka

dick

My first question is just what did he expect the administration to do when his newspaper published top secret codeword classified documents and explained just how our government was tracking the money, a task that the Times said needed to be done right after 9/11. That the whole bunch of them are not now in court defending their decision to print our secret plans and operations so the enemy can recover from them is just their luck that this administration is not prone to be that retaliatory in its response. They are just lucky that LBJ or FDR isn't president now.

What I would also like to hear from him is how he thinks this newspaper, which aborted this operation by printing the classified information and methodology, will work to help the administration recover from their actions. I don't expect to hear anything from them any time soon as I don't really expect them to say anything except we bad, sorry, next? I want the reporters responsible fired or penalized somehow - send them to Thule to count the birds flying over for example or send them to interview the Moonies one by one and alphabetically. Have them write sympathetic stories about Fred Phelps and hawk them in the halls of Walter Reed Hospital. Have them babysit for the local trailer park.

ajacksonian

So, since Mr. Calamity has just come to the conclusion that this was wrong and a bad thing, perhaps he could let us in on the sources that were feeding him this information. The article would not have gotten very far without such, and these insiders seem to have a vested interest in undermining such programs.

He has yet to make that cognitive leap that saying 'I'm sorry' is not the same things as making amends so it does not happen *again*. And that includes going after the sources that gave out this information as the result *did* give operational intel to the enemy on how to move funds and in what amounts to escape ready detection. The enemy was only slightly aware of this before, but NYT coverage made *good ideas* go into the realm of *operational necessities*. Knowing the US Government was doing this in theory was not enough to stop traceable transactions. Making it known that we could and *did* track them was a vital difference.

So please, Mr. Calamity, it is time to come clean as this is about more than your career.

topsecretk9

"An instinctive affinity for the underdog..."

Yeah...Daddy. I agree. This is the silliest excuse for an excuse ever and it's dumb and wrong.

Cecil Turner
Those two factors are really what bring me to this corrective commentary: the apparent legality of the program in the United States, and the absence of any evidence that anyone’s private data had actually been misused.
Did the idea that the program shut down terror networks that otherwise would've been more effective at killing Americans ever occur to him? And if so, how far down in his "factors" list did it rate? Just curious.
Sara (Squiggler)

I'll bring the barf bags.

Sara (Squiggler)

So, since Mr. Calamity has just come to the conclusion that this was wrong and a bad thing, perhaps he could let us in on the sources that were feeding him this information. The article would not have gotten very far without such, and these insiders seem to have a vested interest in undermining such programs.

Perhaps the leaker was revealed in Hanauer and the Times saw that the jig is up? Could be.

clarice

Perhaps, the GJ is questioning some of those involved.

When he comes for tea, we can ask him.

arrowhead

I'll bring the humble pie (laced with elderberry wine).

Rick Ballard

If we're going to hope that this apologia is a 'sign', let's hope that it's a preemptive move on Commissar Calame's part to distance himself from those he believes will soon be undergoing trial for the NSC disclosures.

The thought of Keller, Sulzberger, Risen and Lichtblau wandering aimlessly around the exercise yard at Leavenworth always cheers me up.

I keep wondering of the staff dismissal on the House committee might be a precursor to something similiar happening wrt the Senate intelligence committee. Maybe accompanied by a reading of the Rockefeller memo on national TV...

Sara (Squiggler)

So let's recap: Repub. scandal, outing gay Congressmen. Dem. scandals: Senate Minority leader in fraudulent land deal; House Minority leader and her staffer: guilty of leaking classified intelligence report; NYT admits guilt in leaking national intelligence secrets. And there are still 10 days left in October.

Ill Kim

I'll bring the vodka

Posted by: Jane | October 22, 2006 at 11:13 AM

Rumor has it that vodka is the 'weapon of choice' for the notorious Dr. Deborah Frisch (Phd., don't you know.)

Sara (Squiggler)

Rick, spot on. Hope you don't mind that I've picked up your comment for emphasis in a JOM link HERE

Daddy

They'll use the Eason Jordan Defense:

"Well yes your Honor, we knew that publishing the illegal leak was wrong and unfair to the Administration and severely damaging to the national security of America, but we had to publish it or otherwise we'd have "lost access" in the future to the lawbreaking leakers and their future leaks. Surely that overrides concerns of honesty, decency and integrity."

PeterUK

I'll bring the vacine.

PeterUK

"The thought of Keller, Sulzberger, Risen and Lichtblau wandering aimlessly around the exercise yard at Leavenworth always cheers me up".

I always see it as the showers.

Florence Schmieg

Angry? Frustrated? Solution: Stick it to all of them by going out and voting for Republicans. When they hold both houses the media will spin out of control.

Scrapiron

Think the terrorists instruction book contained the how and when to use throw away cell phones as a result of the leak of the NSA terrorists tracking system had something to do with this 'admission' of treason? One question that need an answer is 'how many American Soldiers have died' as a result of the leaks and the traitorous acts of Hanoi John, Turbin Durbin, Weasel Clinton, Boxer, Peloshi and Kennedy? Hundreds, probably runs 75% + of those killed in combat in Iraq. War crime trials are still going on from WWII, how long will it take to hang all of our traitors?

jerry

Forget these NYTimes distractions, stay the course!

http://thinkprogress.org/2006/10/22/bush-stay-the-course/

Mister Snitch!

"Toothpaste, meet tube."

Indeed.

And of course, the last wheeze of the piece is to BLAME BUSH. The writer still can't take responsibility for his own actions - it's BUSH's fault!

Aha! The Devil made him do it.

But not ONLY was it Bush's fault - it was Bush taking advantage of the writer's NOBLER INSTINCTS! Damn! If only he wasn't such a champion of the downtrodden none of this would have happened!

That Devil. He is REALLY insidious, isn't he? You'd think he'd appeal to one's baser instincts - like, for example, a need to look good to one's peers, to appear noble, to get one's name in print (O Pulitzer, where art thou?). But, no! Instead Satan takes advantage of the writer's pure and selfless desire to do good! (After all, it couldn't have been any of that other suff!)

If only Bush could have inspired some sober contemplation BEFORE this matter went to print in the first place! Oh wait - the administration DID ask that it not be run. That damned Devil! Why, he caused this article to be run by asking that it NOT be published! Uncanny!

Well, one thing's certain: The writer is in thrall to Satan. He can't be allowed to write any more, not with THAT hand up his butt. It's not his fault though! Let's all remember that!

J.M. Heinrichs

I think some are overlooking something: "... to catch any abuses in the absence of media attention- ..."

Evidently classified programmes are bad when the NYT/other MSM is not kept informed of their status.

Cheers

azredneck

s-iron: Why would you ignore poor Rocky???

maryrose

I think something big is about to hit the fan. Calame comes out with this now? It's a CYA move on his part. Pretty soon the NSA investigation will get in full swing and all will start to run for cover. Byron is in a full sprint at this point.

clarice

If any pressies are indicted will the MSM report it?

Mac has been saying for months that that gj is working hard out of the limelight.

SlimGuy

Since in effect his column basically admits malice and forethought, if it becomes apparent there is no Justice Department investigation, then perhaps a nationwide class action suit could be brought under some basis like reckless endangerment of our country and troops due to perhaps letting some terrorists escape detection.

Sara (Squiggler)

I just added a link from Newsbusters where they wonder if the mainstream media will give this any play at all? My comment to that is "Yes!" It will get play. The days of hiding this and depending on the Networks to keep quiet are over. Rush will be all over this in the morning, as will Fox and every other talk radio host. The Blogosphere is already lighting up, and judging by the number of posters here that are new names to me, I think this is going to have traction like you won't believe. There is a lot of anger out here about these leaks.

I also think something very very BIG is about to break and like Maryrose says, this is a premptive CYA.

Mister Snitch!

"Since in effect his column basically admits malice and forethought"

A national class-action suit against the Times over this? Where do I sign?

SlimGuy

Sara

I realize it is easy to do because of all the leaks , but I believe the first part of your post about the White House pleadings and such were actually about the breaking of the NSA program.

However it is likely that similiar thoughts were brought to be used here.

On the other hand maybe I have them confused.

Mister Snitch!

the apparent legality of the program"

APPARENT! As if the Times didn't have a battery of lawyers scouring this for something they could have handed the guy as evidence of illegality! And the best mea culpa we can get, months later, is APPARENT! Dive into a thesaurus, boy, you're looking for a phrase like glaringly obvious.

the absence of any evidence that anyone’s private data had actually been misused

And just when did that become apparent? Only now? No, it was obvious then, and while the writer hoped something would turn up all these months later to vindicate him, nothing has.

I suppose we should acknowledge Mr. Calame's grace in admitting his error, and before the election to boot. And keep in mind, the decsion to publish was not his to make.

Fair enough, but this apology won't do. Give Calame immunity to testify, but prosecute the Times. No need to destroy the paper, just take away Keller's beach house or something, you know, that they'd actually NOTICE.

Sara (Squiggler)

OT -- Wow! Maybe this is old news, but I did not know this before. I am listening to Book TV on CSPAN, the author is David Kuo. He just talked about a time, after an automobile accident, caused by a seizure that turned out to be caused by a brain tumor, landed him in the ICU. He got a call that night from Karl Rove who mentioned that he understood months of hospital stays. Turns out that Rove's wife is a double breast cancer survivor and every night he'd sleep at the hospital to be by her side. I had no idea.

clarice

Mac says he thinks this IS related to the NSA gj.

SlimGuy

Riehl World has an interesting take on how all this may fit into the Hillary in 08 equation

http://www.riehlworldview.com/carnivorous_conservative/2006/10/who_benefits_fr.html

Hillary would welcome near parity in the congress for now. But a majority threatens her ultimate ambition more than Karl Rove. If Dean and the Netroots crash, Hillary, the Democratic Leadership Conference and the Blue Dog Dems are the only ones around to pick up the pieces heading into 2008.

Sara (Squiggler)

I think you are confused, but I could be wrong. I'm pretty sure though that it is this program that caused John Snow, Treasury, to fire accuse the Times of "breathtaking arrogance" and said: "Your charge that our efforts to convince The New York Times not to publish were 'half-hearted' is incorrect and offensive."

Neo

Verdict: Times Public Editor

Not So SWIFT

clarice

As Mac and I recall it, the gj was called to investigate the NSA leak. Tice was listed as the first witness.
OTOH it is possible it has expanded its scope, Sara.

Neo

If Dean and the Netroots crash

Unfortunately, they will crash, especially in CT, but they just won't burn enough.

I predicted a while back that after the 2008 (no matter the outcome), a majority of the "netroots" will become disillusioned with the whole political process and retire.

Sara (Squiggler)

Huh? I'm not sure what the question is. What does the GJ have to do with my characterization of trying to get the Times not to publish on the Swift program? I think I must have missed something. I don't want to have an error and have to do my own mea culpa.

clarice

Sara, the suggestion was made that Calame's apologia was made to distance himself from any criminal charges brought against Timesmen re the publication of this story. The gj was begun to investigate the NSA leak, not this one. But it is possible that it has expanded to Swift or that the Calame was concerned about the direction of the NSA inquiry and decided to tidy up his position on Swift.

SlimGuy

Sara

I agree Snow commented about the financial tracking program, but the full White House press still rings in my mind as to the NSA leak story which was delayed about a year and came on the eve of the Risen Lietchblau book release

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/12/16/AR2005121601716.html

Sara (Squiggler)

I got all that Clarice, but I didn't think I was the one conflating the two. If something I wrote gives that impression, than I want to correct it. The only reference I made to the GJ was to mention it exists and is investigating press leaks in response to a comment made in a linked post.

Sara (Squiggler)

From a JOM post, Tom Maguire:
http://justoneminute.typepad.com/main/2006/06/when_it_snows_i.html

Hmm. At the CNN site, the story is this:

Keller said he knew of only three people outside of the administration who were asked by the administration to contact the paper -- Tom Kean and Lee Hamilton from the 9/11 commission, and Democratic Rep. Jack Murtha.

"Not all of them urged us not to publish," Keller said.

Keller, who was accused of arrogance by Snow, told CNN, "I think it would be arrogant of us to pre-empt the work of Congress and the courts by deciding on our own that these programs are perfectly legal and abuse-proof."

"We spent weeks listening to the administration's case," he said.

Well, I am glad the Times decided to pre-empt Congress by publishing their story rather than deferring to Congressional hearings, legislation, or, dare we say it, Congressional silence.

clarice

I think your Snow remark was confusing--suggesting that that was what the gj was about, Sara.

Sara (Squiggler)

This is what I wrote:

Remember the Swift Program used to monitor and follow the money of terrorists? Remember when the New York Times splashed the details of that program across its front page? Remember how the White House and the intelligence gurus begged the New York Times not to reveal the program? Remember how they even brought in the big gun democrats from the 9/11 Commission to plead with the NYT not to run the story? And who could forget Secretary Snow's angry letter to the Times? Remember? I thought you might.

Not a word about the GJ. I guess I'm the one confused, but not about the two programs or the GJ.

SlimGuy

http://www.newyorkmetro.com/news/media/20334/?imw=Y

Bill Keller, the executive editor of the New York Times, sat on a couch in the Oval Office of the White House, three feet from President George W. Bush, and listened.

For a meeting without historical precedent, the president of the United States had called the Times to the White House to personally try to prevent a state secret from appearing in print—an exposé of the National Security Agency’s efforts to monitor phone calls without court-approved warrants that the Times had held back on for over a year. Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr. sat in a wing chair facing Bush, while Keller and Washington bureau chief Philip Taubman sat across from Bush’s lawyer, Harriet Miers, and national-security adviser Stephen Hadley. General Michael Hayden, the then-director of the National Security Agency, sat alongside Bush with a thick briefing book in his lap.

After stiff pleasantries, Bush issued an emphatic warning: If they revealed the secret program to the public and there was another terrorist attack on American soil, the Paper of Record would be implicated. “The basic message,” recalls Keller, “was, ‘You’ll have blood on your hands.’ ”

The meeting lasted an hour. Afterward, Sulzberger and Keller stood outside the White House. Undaunted by the president’s logic and his threats, Keller told Sulzberger, “Nothing I heard in there changed my mind.” Sulzberger agreed.

Eleven days after the meeting with Bush, the Times defied the president; the story, by James Risen and Eric Licht­blau, was headlined bush lets u.s. spy on callers without courts. That same day, the USA Patriot Act was blocked in the Senate.

Sara (Squiggler)

I do happen to think that the GJ out there is making those at the Times very nervous though and that this is a premptive strike since I think they are already in big trouble over the NSA leak and they don't want double trouble.

Wilson's a liar

Boy, this one sure ranks high on the Unintentional Comedy scale, doesn't it? Almost reads like something from Scrappleface.

SlimGuy

Sara is correct that this story is getting blog coverage.

I checked and almost every one of my top 20 blogs have something to say on it in one form or another.

Sara (Squiggler)

From Snow's letter to the Times posted on Squiggler 6/26/2006:

Your charge that our efforts to convince The New York Times not to publish were "half-hearted" is incorrect and offensive. Nothing could be further from the truth. Over the past two months, Treasury has engaged in a vigorous dialogue with the Times - from the reporters writing the story to the D.C. Bureau Chief and all the way up to you. It should also be noted that the co-chairmen of the bipartisan 9-11 Commission, Governor Tom Kean and Congressman Lee Hamilton, met in person or placed calls to the very highest levels of the Times urging the paper not to publish the story. Members of Congress, senior U.S. Government officials and well-respected legal authorities from both sides of the aisle also asked the paper not to publish or supported the legality and validity of the program.

Indeed, I invited you to my office for the explicit purpose of talking you out of publishing this story. And there was nothing "half-hearted" about that effort. I told you about the true value of the program in defeating terrorism and sought to impress upon you the harm that would occur from its disclosure. I stressed that the program is grounded on solid legal footing, had many built-in safeguards, and has been extremely valuable in the war against terror. Additionally, Treasury Under Secretary Stuart Levey met with the reporters and your senior editors to answer countless questions, laying out the legal framework and diligently outlining the multiple safeguards and protections that are in place.

You have defended your decision to compromise this program by asserting that "terror financiers know" our methods for tracking their funds and have already moved to other methods to send money. The fact that your editors believe themselves to be qualified to assess how terrorists are moving money betrays a breathtaking arrogance and a deep misunderstanding of this program and how it works. While terrorists are relying more heavily than before on cumbersome methods to move money, such as cash couriers, we have continued to see them using the formal financial system, which has made this particular program incredibly valuable.

Lastly, justifying this disclosure by citing the "public interest" in knowing information about this program means the paper has given itself free license to expose any covert activity that it happens to learn of - even those that are legally grounded, responsibly administered, independently overseen, and highly effective. Indeed, you have done so here.

What you've seemed to overlook is that it is also a matter of public interest that we use all means available - lawfully and responsibly - to help protect the American people from the deadly threats of terrorists. I am deeply disappointed in the New York Times.

Sara (Squiggler)

From Snow's letter to the Times posted on Squiggler 6/26/2006:

Your charge that our efforts to convince The New York Times not to publish were "half-hearted" is incorrect and offensive. Nothing could be further from the truth. Over the past two months, Treasury has engaged in a vigorous dialogue with the Times - from the reporters writing the story to the D.C. Bureau Chief and all the way up to you. It should also be noted that the co-chairmen of the bipartisan 9-11 Commission, Governor Tom Kean and Congressman Lee Hamilton, met in person or placed calls to the very highest levels of the Times urging the paper not to publish the story. Members of Congress, senior U.S. Government officials and well-respected legal authorities from both sides of the aisle also asked the paper not to publish or supported the legality and validity of the program.

Indeed, I invited you to my office for the explicit purpose of talking you out of publishing this story. And there was nothing "half-hearted" about that effort. I told you about the true value of the program in defeating terrorism and sought to impress upon you the harm that would occur from its disclosure. I stressed that the program is grounded on solid legal footing, had many built-in safeguards, and has been extremely valuable in the war against terror. Additionally, Treasury Under Secretary Stuart Levey met with the reporters and your senior editors to answer countless questions, laying out the legal framework and diligently outlining the multiple safeguards and protections that are in place.

You have defended your decision to compromise this program by asserting that "terror financiers know" our methods for tracking their funds and have already moved to other methods to send money. The fact that your editors believe themselves to be qualified to assess how terrorists are moving money betrays a breathtaking arrogance and a deep misunderstanding of this program and how it works. While terrorists are relying more heavily than before on cumbersome methods to move money, such as cash couriers, we have continued to see them using the formal financial system, which has made this particular program incredibly valuable.

Lastly, justifying this disclosure by citing the "public interest" in knowing information about this program means the paper has given itself free license to expose any covert activity that it happens to learn of - even those that are legally grounded, responsibly administered, independently overseen, and highly effective. Indeed, you have done so here.

What you've seemed to overlook is that it is also a matter of public interest that we use all means available - lawfully and responsibly - to help protect the American people from the deadly threats of terrorists. I am deeply disappointed in the New York Times.

Sara (Squiggler)

Cripes, sorry about the double posting. Typepad is giving me fits this afternoon.

SlimGuy

Sara

I missed the part about Kean and Hamilton in your post.

Seems you were right and I am wrong, because I was trying to recall those names and that discussion.

For that lady I appologize.

Somehow I thought there was a similar third party plea also done with regard the the NSA leak story.

So many leaks I must have conflated the reactions.

Again I am sorry.

Extraneus

While it’s a close call now, as it was then, I don’t think the article should have been published.

Yes, quite a close call. And assuming he has any, perhaps in the event his kids are someday incinerated in their schoolbus by a foreign-financed jihadi that might otherwise have been detected by the aforementioned program, I'd imagine that might also give some infinitesimal additional weight to what remains...an extremely close call.

Rick Ballard

Publishing the NSA story appears to put the NYT in serious legal jeopardy according to the plain language of Section 798(a)(3). I'm not at all sure that there is a section that covers disclosure of the SWIFT program.

I would just like to know why the DoJ hasn't indicted on the NSA disclosure yet.

POSTING NOTE: If TypeKey isn't "remembering" your comment information - name, etc. - double click the 'empty' box. My info pops right up when I do so.

Sara (Squiggler)

No problem Slim. I wanted to clear it up because to have to do a mea culpa on a post about a mea culpa is kind of not good, huh? Whew!

Sara (Squiggler)

I think the reason this makes me so mad is because the White House tried so hard, after the NSA debacle, to do it right and still got screwed by Pinch and the Gang.

Extraneus

Oh, and nice posts, Mister Snitch!

SlimGuy

BTW

The article I linked in another post above

http://www.newyorkmetro.com/news/media/20334/?imw=Y

is a rather long profile of Bill Keller, his history and a lot of insight into the man.

Recommend it highly , it is a good read.

Sue

What is the 'empty' box?

SlimGuy

Sue

Sometimes after doing a post, typepad forgets your name and email and blanks them out.

If you double click each box it will let you recover that info from a dropdown list

Sue

Slim,

Oh. I already knew that. I thought it was something better. ::grin::

SlimGuy

Sue

I guess if our favorite troll was here he would probably turn that into a commentary on either Old Maids or Nuns to expose his freudian tendancies

LOL

Sue

Slim,

::grin::

You know, it really is kind of sleazy to bury the mea culpa, in the article and behind the wall.

DRF

As the NY Times audience shrinks it
becomes progressively more progressive.
It will become more partisan more hysterical
more shrill. Does Byron recognize this?

Sara (Squiggler)

Of course it is Sue. And they have no respect for the blogger out here, and think they will get away with it because (1) no one but their synchophants will see it, and (2) none of them will care. Newsbusters thinks the MSM will ignore. Won't work.

Sara (Squiggler)

OT -- Fox just reported: Jane Wyman dead at age 96.

PS-- My Typepad problem isn't my name, it is having to reload the page twice just to get the POST BUTTON to show up.

MayBee

The fact that the Bush admin pushed so hard to keep the NYTs from publishing this story makes Calame's complaints about their vehement criticism afterwards all the more ridiculous.
It should have been entirely expected.

Bill Keller's defense of publishing the story has always been weak, again especially considering that it was entirely expected the admin was unhappy with that decision.

That none of them were better prepared to defend the decision to publish, knowing the criticism was coming, is inexcusible. How much of a bubble do you have to live in to expect that someone telling you NOT to do something wouldn't criticize you for doing that very thing?

What Calame meant to say:
...What kept me from seeing these matters more clearly earlier in what admittedly was a close call? I fear I live in a bubble, and you know how enticing it is too look at the pretty surface, and not through it.

Sara (Squiggler)

For the younger crowd, Jane Wyman was Ronald Reagan's first wife, adoptive mother of well-known pundit/talk show host, Michael Reagan.

anonymous

Thanks for the reminder. Mr. Reagan probably forgot that himself from time to time.

maryrose

Jane Wyman was a fabulous actress. "Magnificent Obsession "with Rock Hudson comes to mind as well as "Johnny Belinda". And of course the tv show" Falcon Crest" Ok I've unearthed my hidden talent- I know movie and tv trivia.

Tara

Reagan can be excused from remembering his marriage to JANE WYATT ..who died at 96 today, since he was never married to her.

He was married to Jane Wyman

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/22/AR2006102200683.html?nav=rss_artsandliving/entertainmentnews

SlimGuy

Shouldn't have mentioned it.

There goes the neighborhood!

Sara (Squiggler)

Color me stupid and red. Of course, Slim you are right. It's the Benadryl I'm taking. Jane Wyatt, the Mom in Father Knows Best.

Vulgorilla

Ah yes ... trash the national security first, ask questions later. Benedict Arnold - blazing a trail for Ted Kennedy and The New York Times.

SlimGuy

Kinda like making a left turn AFTER you hit the iceberg with the Titanic.

Like the dems, you get a "new direction", but still have that sinking feeling.

maryrose

I'm good with trivia unless I get the name wrong. Who can forget Robert Young, Elinore Donohue and Kitten and Bud.I grew up with that show.

SlimGuy

Sara

Actually the credit goes to Tara not me. But I'll some of whatever yer takin LOL

topsecretk9

--I fear I allowed the vicious criticism of The Times by the Bush administration to trigger my instinctive affinity for the underdog--

This is such a lie. On the one hand Calame acknowledges the Times were so UNAFRAID of the Admin as to flip them the bird and publish a story the Admin implored them not to and the the other reflective defense because the Time's was so vicious attacked? Since when has the Times been so afraid of Admin criticism?

Never.


This is the same lie the MSM pedaled in the Plame affair. As time goes on, more and more of the media acknowledge Wilson was a blowhard and so by proxy there was no WH viscous smear attack machine. Some still cling to the notion that while Wilson was full of beetle-juice the Admin acted obnoxiously (Pincus)...and yet the argument is to hollow.

This shrinking violet pose is cute, but utterly dishonest.

SlimGuy

TS9

The just keep adding more to the story to confuse the issue.

Like my dear old dad used to say,

If your looking for a needle in a haystack, it is not productive to add more hay.

SlimGuy

OT

YouTube has banned another conservative blogger.

http://newsbusters.org/node/8513

Sara (Squiggler)

Maryrose, I had such a crush on Bud but not as much as my fantasies about Ricky Nelson.

MayBee

TS9- You are exactly right. His explanation (because Bush said we shouldn't!) fits better with why they published rather than why he defended their choice to publish.

ajacksonian

What really gets me is that in 'a close call' the interest of the Nation, as a whole, does *not* get the benefit of the doubt. That is how far the *patriotic* MSM has gone: the warnings of elected officials are doubted *first*. Unless, of course, you have a (D) designator after your name.

I doubt that Mr. Calamity was driven by someone *else* in the hot seat or about to reveal themselves as the source of information, but to revisit this subject and show just how much the NYT is out to protect you, the unsuspecting public, against the viciousness of an Administration bent on... well... tracking terrorists. Yes, so dangerous that is, a President exercising his Constitutionally given Rights as President to use foreign sources to find those that would attack the Nation.

Dear me! Someone in the Government actually trying to do their job! Alert the media!

Oh, they don't like that.... what is it that they do like? If you *don't* do your job you get attacked. If you *do* your job, you get doubted, mistrusted and, yes, attacked. A very poor watchdog that barks all the time, at anything, without need to.

Sara (Squiggler)

My present fantasy is that the New York Times will sink into bankruptcy and some really rich right winger will come in and scoop them up, which is second only to the fantasy of seeing Pinch frog marched off Times Square and into the hooskow.

PeterUK

The reason these mighty panjandrums of the press flipped the administration the bird is obvious,the latter were not sufficiently deferential,they should have said pretty pleae,with sugar on it,if that had failed they should have used the horses head

SlimGuy

Sara

I have seen speculation in the finacial media that Pinch is trying to drive down the price of the stock so that he can cheaply buy it up and take the company private.

It already has a very strange two tier structure of the stock ownership rights and board member makeup.

Jane

Sara,

(I keep trying to post this and lose my connection)

I just read your blog (again). It is concise, easy to read, informative, and really, a pleasure.

Sara (Squiggler)

Thank you very much Jane.

Sara (Squiggler)

I don't know Slim. Their profits are way down because newspapers are losing advertising revenue right and left and they have that giant new money pit cathedral of self-importance they are building draining them dry.

SlimGuy

True,

But the money for the buyout will come from doing a sale / leasback of the building once it is finished. Numbers say he could generate 600 mil on the rollover. His other problem is the 1.1 billion he invested in the Boston Globe properties.

But hey what do I know , i'm the dummie who bought 100 share of bershire hathaway back in January of 97 for 1100 per share.

Closing price for that last week was in the neighboorhood of 99,900 per share.

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