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April 01, 2007

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Patrick R. Sullivan

Mark Steyn on the British hostages:

'On this 25th anniversary of the Falklands War, Tony Blair is looking less like Margaret Thatcher and alarmingly like Jimmy Carter, the embodiment of the soi-disant "superpower" as a smiling eunuch.'

Which is how, I suspect, Waxman looks to Condi.

Semanticleo

Uranium from Niger?......................

No wonder she doesn't call.

She might need to invoke the 5th, just in case she has to lie.

Semanticleo

Forgot the link. (Just in case Condi visits JOM)

http://www.law.com/jsp/article.jsp?id=1175245444489

Tom

What's to lie about? She could simply say that as of 2002, British intelligence services were reporting that Saddam had recently sought to acquire uranium in Africa. This fact was later confirmed by those same British intelligence services, as well as by portly "ambassador" Joe Wilson in his oral report to the CIA, as cofirmed by the bipartisan Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. I suppose she might simply write back to Mr. Waxman, tell him she's really quite busy at present, and enclose a copy of the SSCI report for his perusal.

Tom

Maybe Condi could just refer Waxman to this item:

“Wilson reported that he had met with Niger's former Prime Minister Ibrahim Mayaki, who said that in June 1999 he was asked to meet with a delegation from Iraq to discuss 'expanding commercial relations' between the two countries.
Based on what Wilson told them, CIA analysts wrote an intelligence report saying former Prime Minister Mayki ‘interpreted “expanding commercial relations” to mean that the (Iraqi) delegation wanted to discuss uranium yellowcake sales.’ In fact, the Intelligence Committee report said that "for most analysts" Wilson's trip to Niger ‘lent more credibility to the original Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) reports on the uranium deal.’"

Fact Check, http://www.factcheck.org/article222.html

Mark

Instead of the typical Bush administration ankle grabbing she ought to just go in with the intelligence from the Brits and Italians that led us to the assumption and also make Joe Wilson take the stand and while we are at it bring in some Nigerian officials that Chris Hitchens has wrote about.

None of this will be done though because it's a witchhunt to get Bush administration officials and pretty much everyone knows it. There isn't any interest in the truth, sorta like the Libby trial.

Semanticleo

"a witchhunt to get Bush'

They will keep seeking their perp even if they have to settle for income tax evasion.

Those bastards!

Other Tom

Maybe Condi could just send him this excerpt from the SSCI Report:

“When the former ambassador spoke to Committee staff, his description of his findings differed from the DO intelligence report and his account of information provided to him by the CIA differed from the CIA officials’ accounts in some respects. First, the former ambassador described his findings to Committee staff as more directly related to Iraq and, specifically, as refuting both the possibility that Niger could have sold uranium to Iraq and that Iraq approached Niger to purchase uranium. The intelligence report described how the structure of Niger’s uranium mines would make it difficult, if not impossible, for Niger to sell uranium to rouge [sic] nations, and noted that Nigerien officials denied knowledge of any deals to sell uranium to any rogue states, but did not refute the possibility that Iraq had approached Niger to purchase uranium. Second, the former ambassador said that he discussed with his CIA contacts which names and signatures should have appeared on any documentation of a legitimate uranium transaction. In fact, the intelligence report made no mention of the alleged Iraq-Niger uranium deal or signatures that should have appeared on any documentation of such a deal. The only mention of Iraq in the report pertained to the meeting between the Iraqi delegation and former Prime Minister Mayaki. Third, the former ambassador noted that his CIA contacts told him there were documents pertaining to the alleged Iraq-Niger uranium transaction and that the source of the information was the [ ] intelligence service. The DO reports officer told Committee staff that he did not provide the former ambassador with any information about the source or details of the original reporting as it would have required sharing classified information and, noted that there were no 'documents' circulating in the IC at the time of the former ambassador’s trip, only intelligence reports from [ ] intelligence regarding an alleged Iraq-Niger uranium deal. Meeting notes and other correspondence show that details of the reporting were discussed at the February 19, 2002 meeting, but none of the meeting participants recall telling the former ambassador the source of the report.”

And yes, Cleo dear, those two "Tom" posts above were my very own.

Semanticleo

", those two "Tom" posts above were my very own."

You can run, but................

Cecil Turner

. . . regarding the Administration’s claims that Iraq sought uranium from Niger . . .

Niger, Africa . . . whatever.

Other Tom

"You can run, but................" Try as I might, I just can't ascribe any meaning at all to that statement.

Maybe someone more knowledgeable than I could enlighten us all on the dynamics involved here. In particular, what is the obligation, if any, of the executive to respond to letter requests from either minority members or committee chairs? And what is the obligation to appear and testify? I know that ultimately the congress has subpoena power, which I think is rarely used. I don't believe that, in general, executive privilege applies to communications between a president and a secretary of state (although I suppose that might depend on the nature of a particular communication), but for the period when Condi was the NSA that privilege might be more likely to apply.

Any present or former committee staffers--or anyone else--out there have any knowledge?

EH

Does anybody want to sign my petition to make it illegal for Congress to request information from the Cabinet?

Other Tom

EH, I assume you're not serious about any such petition. But I renew my request to hear from anyone with knowledge of the groundrules.

section9

I actually believe that Fred Fielding is prepping Condi for an appearance before Waxman. She's holding out to force Waxman to subpoena her. IMHO, it's what the WH wants. Waxman is, at bottom, a partisan who is basically trying to run a show trial. What he has done, however, is to try to get in front of him someone who is deeply familiar with how to handle show trials.

Condi cut her teeth on studying the Moscow Show Trials, remember.

Waxman has done two stupid things: hang his entire hat on Jumpin' Joe Wilson and depend on Valerie Plame's Walkin' By Guy, who never showed up in her earlier testimony.

He's also, if I recall correctly, serially dissed the work product of the Senate Intelligence Committee in 2004, which hasn't made Kit Bond and other members of that Committee happy. Expect them to reappear at a strategic moment.

I suspect that Condi is setting up a confrontational atmosphere, to use Waxman's innate anger and overreaching against him. He has no real facts to use against her, but Waxman will treat her like he treats a tobbacco executive and she'll eviscerate him on live television. Watch. Rice is ignoring him to get him mad. Waxman knows he'll come under pressure from his staffers and the Spastic Nutroots to "Get Bush's Bitch! Expose the Lies!"

I see this in Moonbat coverage of this event. Their salivating like rabid dogs. So you can imagine how this is percolating up to committee staffers. They're hunting for Big Game.

They're willing believers of the BushLiedTheyDied Narrative too, of course, so you can see how this will end up.

I knew, eventually, that Waxman would come after Rice. He just can't help himself. The problem with the Left is that they believe their own Narrative about Joe Wilson and Yellowcake in Niger. It's all built on a lie. And it's all going to come apart.

Cecil Turner

Hey, speaking of misleading the public, Waxman's letter is a gold mine of bogus info:

  1. My inquiries cover vital issues within the Committee's oversight jurisdiction, including your role in the President's false assertion that Iraq was seeking uranium from Niger . . .
  2. In my letter, I asked why the President had included the bogus Niger claim in his January 28,2003, State of the Union address . . .
  3. It was subsequently revealed, however, that the CIA had sent a memo directly to you and your deputy at the time, Stephen Hadley, raising doubts about the Niger claim . . .
  4. Because these revelations directly contradicted your previous public statements . . .
  5. As a result of your failure to respond, the Committee still does not know what you knew about the fabricated Niger claim and when you knew it. We also do not know how the fabricated claim made it into the President's State of the Union address . . .
  6. We continue to learn in a piecemeal fashion about other explicit wamings received by White House officials about this bogus claim. According to one recent press account, for example . . .

    Does anybody want to sign my petition to make it illegal for Congress to request information from the Cabinet?

    They can request all they want. Not sure why the Administration ought to cooperate, however. And it's downright hilarious that members apparently view the freedom from arrest provision as protecting their freezers from cash inspections, whilst simultaneously demanding the right to lay perjury traps for Administration officials.

Charlie (Colorado)

Personally, I think Rice is ignoring these letters for the same reason the Secretary of Defense ignores letters about aliens mutilating cattle in the San Luis Valley.

Charlie (Colorado)

From Leo's link (and by the way, for cripes sake learn how to code an HTML link, what are you, nine?)

Taking the Fifth Amendment is everybody's right. But it's a choice that can send up a red flag, often invoked by people who have something to hide.

Leo, I know you're neither old enough nor informed enough to remember this, but you might want to look up the phrases "House Unamerican Activities Committee", "Robert F Kennedy", "Are you now, or have you ever been a member of the Communist Party?" "Fifth Amendment" and "Hollywood Ten" before you start down the road of claiming someone who takes the Fifth must be guilty of something.

Charlie (Colorado)

'On this 25th anniversary of the Falklands War, Tony Blair is looking less like Margaret Thatcher and alarmingly like Jimmy Carter, the embodiment of the soi-disant "superpower" as a smiling eunuch.'

Which is how, I suspect, Waxman looks to Condi.

Posted by: Patrick R. Sullivan | April 01, 2007 at 12:09 PM

I don't know that I've seen Waxman smile much.

Semanticleo

"I know that ultimately the congress has subpoena power, which I think is rarely used."

And that means what? I mean if the 'Prez decides on confrontation, (doubtful, commenter above is correct that this is what
Rice is seeking, based upon her Noveau-Powellian reincarnation as Diplomat first, SabreRattler second) what con Congressdo?

Even Nixon abhorred such a scenario. I doubt this crew has that core respect for the system it supposedly serves.

Semanticleo

"Think of Enron's Andrew Fastow and Iran-Contra's Oliver North."

Nice cherry-pasting, Chaco. Sentence above is
the last sentence of graf you pasted.

"before you start down the road of claiming someone who takes the Fifth must be guilty of something."

Yes, I know how you grieve for the innocents
like Fastow and 'Ollie'.

Other Tom

"And that means what?" What it means, Cleo, is that the congress has subpoena power, and that I think it is rarely used. Pull your head out of your ass for once.

Since poor Cleo has expressly declined my invitation to shed some light on the groundrules in effect when such congressional requests are made, I will await commentary from an informed reader.

Semanticleo

"I will await commentary from an informed reader."

Since you do not qualify, I assume your comments will not be necessary.

Cecil Turner

I doubt this crew has that core respect for the system it supposedly serves.

Nonsense. What can Congress do?

    Among other things:
  1. Impeach
  2. cut off funding
  3. refuse to confirm officials
  4. legislate
Of course, the most extreme measures require a 2/3 supermajority, but if Congress is united, it is by far the most powerful of the branches. Interestingly, while modern hand-wringing is almost entirely about the power of the Executive, it was limiting Congress that the Framers found most problematic (Federalist 51):
But it is not possible to give to each department an equal power of self-defense. In republican government, the legislative authority necessarily predominates. The remedy for this inconveniency is to divide the legislature into different branches . . .

Terrye

I hope Condi takes the fifth, I hope it becomes a mantra. I am already tired of this.

But hey, if they really want to go down that road they need to start dragging in Clinton adiministration people to answer these questions, after all that is where a lot of the intel came from.

And maybe Waxman should get a transcript of the speech before he starts running his mouth. There was nothing in that speech that was not true. In fact they did find several hundred of tons of yellowcake in Iraq, so the fact that Saddam might be laying out some feelers in Africa should not come as a surprise.


SunnyDay

I watched Waxman's hearing about GSA, and the interrogation of Lurita Doan - Waxman is really kind of funny, with his rat-face. I usually try to respect the office, but he's making it kinda difficult.

Now I'm hooked on hearings. I'm watching the replay of the Sampson questioning on c span now.

Terrye

This current tak that Congress is taking really does remind me of Joe McCarthy and his claims that there were commies everywhere. For awhile he was a big man, but then after sometime of making accusations that never really panned out and interrogating all kinds of people who took the fifth as a form of public protest...the tide turned and the Republicans dealt with him themselves. But in the meantime he made life as difficult as he could for Truman.

I think of Waxman as a cross between the Church Lady and McCarthy.

Charlie (Colorado)

Yes, I know how you grieve for the innocents
like Fastow and 'Ollie'.

Its bad enough you don't know who the Hollywood Ten were; the fact that you didn't google them after I gave you the freaking hint is just unutterably moronic.

Semanticleo

Nonsense.

Most federal judges encourage the two parties
to reach an accommodation. It has never been tested to recalcitrant scofflaws.

See PDF on case studies from 1975 to 1981.

http://www.senate.gov/reference/resources/pdf/RL31836.pdf

Semanticleo

"Its bad enough you don't know who the Hollywood Ten were; the fact that you didn't google them after I gave you the freaking hint is just unutterably moronic."

You ASSume. What a maroon.

sferris

More Hearings, Please

When you have the majority in both Houses you can hold all the hearings you want. When Congress is back in session Waxman, Leahy, and Conyers are going to start holding more hearings. Yes, the hearings will be investigating Republicans. Pass the popcorn.

Cecil Turner

I hope Condi takes the fifth, I hope it becomes a mantra. I am already tired of this.

She ought to send a letter in reply, pointing out the numerous errors and fallacies in Waxman's invitation. She should then decline to appear, and tell him she'd be happy to get back with him after he reads the SSCI report and decides to start treating the subject seriously.

Semanticleo

"She should then decline to appear,"

Should Congress send military police to the WH and conduct a perpwalk?

Terrye

Cecil:

Yes she should. I am sure that he knows already, but it does not hurt to remind Wasman. Otherwise he will go right on looking stupid.

and sferris: Do they have the right to abuse it? I suppose so, I think the Republicans made a mistake impeaching Clinton, but I will say this the Democrats are proving they are not one bit better.

By the way, the Congress has an obligation to keep its promises. They promised to make gas cheap again. So where is my cheap gas? They promised to only raise taxes on the rich and now they are trying to pass the largest tax increase in history, on everyone...even the poor. And the list goes on. Believe it or not most Americans are more interested in their own lives and needs etc than they are in this endless idiotic cat fight.

Semanticleo

"Believe it or not most Americans are more interested in their own lives and needs etc than they are in this endless idiotic cat fight."

Yeah.. Nielson thugs force them to watch 'reality' TV at the point of a gun. They
don't like catfights. Sheesh.

Terrye

Cleo:

Oh yeah, people would love that.

I would like to see an investigation of Sandy Berger to find out just exactly what he destroyed. I would also like to see an investigation of the intel gathered through the Clinton years, the intel that was passed along to the Bush administration. If the Democrats really want to get at the truth, they need to go back to the source. Such as the 90's and the CIA.

Larry

"...Joe McCarthy and his claims that there were commies everywhere."
Posted by: Terrye | April 01, 2007 at 02:37 PM There were commies and commie sympathisers everywhere. Alger Hiss was tried and convicted (of perjury because the statute of limitations for espionage had expired). His accuser, Whittaker Chambers, a reformed commie, had been his "handler". McCarthy's tactics were despicable, but his strategy was spot on. BTW, some conflate McCarthy and HUAC. H in HUAC is "house". Joe was a senator.

sferris

More 5th Amendment Pleas, Please

"I hope Condi takes the fifth, I hope it becomes a mantra", and so do Democrats.

roanoke

section 9

Condi was taught by Madeliene Albright's father.

Speaking of ineptitude and the DOE how is it that everyone forgets all that went on there under Bill Richardson's watch?

Oh right there's that...

Speaking of Presidential candidates just to irk everyone at once Fred Thompson in some respects is reminding me of Bill Bradley...

Good Day Sirs!

SunnyDay

Terrye - that's funny.

The DUer's and MoveOn-er's said from the start they wanted to impeach Bush. A bloodless coup.

Not only that, the Dem's have no plan, no ideas, no nothing, except a desire for destruction and revenge.

Listening to Sampson - sounds like that boy's learned a hard lesson. What a comedy of errors. Sampson should have been kept and McNulty should have been fired, IMO.

Semanticleo

"I would like to see an investigation of Sandy Berger to find out just exactly what he destroyed. I would also like to see an investigation of the intel gathered through the Clinton years, the intel that was passed along to the Bush administration."

You'll have to wait until Republicans are the majority. That shouldn't take more than 40 to 50 years.

SunnyDay

Good Day Sirs!
*************

hehehe

MikeS

Should Congress send military police to the WH ...

That says it all.

roanoke

Terrye-

Well Sandy Berger has an auditory neuroma-so he's off to rehab with excuse in hand.

SunnyDay

Yeah, Mike, don't let them take your guns.

Terrye

Cleo:

That was stupid and you are missing my point. When the Democrats run on something like high gas prices and yammer on about how they are going to by God do something about that and then when they get into office the only damn thing they care about is harassing the hell out of Rove...that does not make people happy. They get tired of that. The American people by and large are under the impression that these people work for them..at least on some level and then when they blow off the constituents as soon as they are elected that kind of gets to people.

In the past it has worked that way eventually for most people. Look at the business with Clinton and how that effected the Republicans, it hurt them and McCarthy might have been riding high for awhile but he ended up shooting himself.

So there is a limited life span for that kind of thing. Especially if there is really nothing to show for it.

Semanticleo

"The American people by and large are under the impression that these people work for them"

I assume the 'Prez also works for them.

Do you think the 70% that oppose the war in Iraq will tire of the catfight as long as Bush ignores the people's will?

sferris

Demmocrats learned a lesson form Republican over-reach - no impeachment, investigate corruption and incompetence. It's working.

bio mom

The last Gallup Poll for congressional approval, just out last week, was at 29. The overall congressional approval average currently, reported at Real Clear Politics, is 30. Bush's poll numbers are higher!! I almost puked seeing that idiot Nancy Pelosi make her high and mighty remark to the President to calm down, there's a new Congress in town!! Like that means a president can no longer veto something?? She should be an embarassment to Democrats. I suspect behind the scenes she is. Rahm Emmanuel, a very smart and quite ruthless politician, obviously despises her.

Terrye

So is this all the Democrats are going to do for the next two years? Raise taxes and harass Republicans? Oh yeah, and pander to the terrorists, how could I forget?

So... I was talking to a friend and we tried to think of the last time someone on the left really helped anyone.

Bush did more for the people suffering from Aids in Africa. He did not posture and preen as much but in terms of real help, his administration has been more generous than any before have been.

I can not think of any people suffering under tyranny and dictatorship that they helped. In fact as a general rule they are far more likely to be on the side of the dictator than the oppressed.

Unless it is Pinochet. Pinochet is one of the few Latin American strong men the left have not reflexively pandered to.

But back in the good old days of the Cold War they loved Mao and Stalin and the Khmer Rouge and the Viet Cong.

The closest we could think of in terms of liberating someone would be Kosovo {and so far as I remember even when Republicans questioned the wisdom of the action, they never tried to sabotage it.}

The Civil Rights Movement was the closest I can think of domestically in recent years. However, look at how the people who inherited that movement have demagogued it and let down the people they professed to support.

No, all in all for all the self righteous, sanctimonious, preening and preaching the hypocrites of the left have a pretty sorry track record.

And now ofcourse after years of bitching about Saddam Hussein they have decided the butcher of Baghdad is a victim. Pitiful.

MikeS

I agree with Terrye. The public gets tired of these hearings when they become political shows.

So far the A.G. scandal is the most serious of the Bush Presidency. That one seems to boil down to Sampson describing a glass as half full, when Gonzales had described it has half empty.

Terrye

Ignore the people's will? Bush was elected to a second term when that war was going on, now we hear that he is supposed to do what? Surrender, call an all out retreat because of opinion polls?

I have looked in the Constitution and try as I might, there is no reference to opinion polls.

BTW, most Americans still say they want to win, so if Bush has to listen to polls, perhaps that is the one he is paying attention to. And most polls do not support cut and run either.

sferris

I wouldn't put your hopes on Congressional approval ratings. There is a lot of pressure from house/senate constituents for holding hearings. Historically, Congressional approval ratings have been lower then presidential ratings. It's hard to herd cats.

bio mom

Bye the way, I don't think Congress has any authority over the military police. Constitution, and all that.

Semanticleo

"most Americans still say they want to win"

So let's get rid of the obstacle; The 'Rube
Goldberg" architects.

bio mom

sferris, You are the one grasping at straws with that remark. You obviously see everything through your own distorted prism. Just before your sainted 2006 election, the MSM was touting how much more popular Congress was than the President. So stuff it. And also beware of statements like permanent Democrat majority, etc. That was exactly what the Republicans were saying in 2004. In this country, there is no such thing as a permanent majority nor will there ever be.

MikeS

Bye the way, I don't think Congress has any authority over the military police

That pesky Constitution!

Semanticleo

"there is no such thing as a permanent majority nor will there ever be."

Dems held the House for 40 years (1952-1994)

Permanent no. But pretty close. Can you
wait until 2047?

bio mom

And Republicans have held the presidency for all but 12 years since 1968. Actually, unless you have over 60 certain votes in the Senate and veto-proof majorities in the house and senate, no one controls anything really. And that is just what the founders intended.

Other Tom

"Should Congress send military police to the WH and conduct a perpwalk?"

I have some truly terrible news for you, Cleo--absolutely terrible: the Congress does not have any military police. None at all, you beetle-witted simpleton. Were you unaware of this fundamental fact? Are you unaware that Honest Abe Lincoln used the power of the executive to arrest a former Democratic congressman who was seeking the governorship of Ohio? He had the man arrested and deported to the confederacy, simply for expressing disfavored opinions in his political campaign. You would be wise to inform yourself as to he various powers of the three co-equal branches.

When the Chief Justice issued an order enjoining President Andrew Jackson from implementing the Indian Relocation Act, Jackson famously declared that the Justice had issued his order, "now let us see him enforce it." The Indians were duly relocated.

This is why I pose the questions I do about past practices and protocols concerning congressional requests for information from the executive. In seeking responses from informed readers, I am indeed suggesting that I do not purport to be informed--or at least not particularly well-informed--on this subject. But I am surely no better informed after reading any of your hysterical recent entries here.

Lady Sara

I hate to burst everybody's bubble. My son's college government affairs class was assigned a survey project. The survey was to identify how much the general public knows about their government leaders and major issues of the day. The list was made up of top officials of the present and former Administrations and of Congresscritters and some who make the news on a regular basis.

The results, to say the least, are depressing. Over 40% of those surveyed at malls, sporting events and on college campuses didn't even know who Dick Cheney is. Those numbers become astronomical when names like Pelosi, DeLay, Leahy, Albright, Berger, Plame and Kennedy were asked about. 25% thought Ted Kennedy was a former President. Even in So. Calif. 76% had no idea who Pelosi is. Even Arnold the Governator who you would expect everyone to know, had more than 40% who could not name him as Governor of Calif., but they knew he was a body builder and movie star. I don't recall if Waxman was on the list, but if he was, I'd bet his numbers were in the 90%-100% range of being unknown.

The best informed were those in the 40 to 65 year old range. Those who watched Fox were better informed than those who watched CNN and CNN watchers were better informed than those who watched network news.

The top issue for the 18-25 age range was college tuition help, the top issue for those in the 40-65 range was social security reform and disgust that we don't just drop the "bomb" on the Middle East and be done with them. The 25-45 age range was all over the map with immigration reform high on their list and education also high. Since this age range is most likely to have school age children, this makes sense.

The 40-65 and the over 65 groups were best informed about National Security, those in the 18-25 group did not care about National Security, over 35% saying National Security had nothing to do with them.

This survey was mostly to give these college kids a taste of just how uniformed the public really is and was not to be construed as a poll.

Lady Sara

Excuse my double typo above, the 40-65 age should read 45-65.

Other Tom

"Do you think the 70% that oppose the war in Iraq will tire of the catfight as long as Bush ignores the people's will?"

With respect to Mr. Bush, the people get to express their will every four years. On the two occasions on which they are constitutionally permitted to do so, they have elected him president. Fifty-one percent of the voters in 2004 returned him to the office of commander-in-chief, and the constitution directs that there he shall remain until January 20, 2009. If you can persuade yourself that you must live with this fact, you will no doubt grow into a better, more mature woman.


Cecil Turner

Should Congress send military police to the WH and conduct a perpwalk?

Heh. Yep, a rarely cited (and often missed) check in the ol' balance system. Gotta love self-parody.

This is why I pose the questions I do about past practices and protocols concerning congressional requests for information from the executive.

I'm not too sure about precedent, but the source document is fairly well-written. And, other than impeachment, I see no provisions for Congressional authority to arrest or detain or question Executive officers. I suspect there's a reason it ain't there.

Other Tom

"John Marshall has made his decision. Now let him enforce it!"

--Andrew Jackson

Let Henry Waxman enforce his. Henry Waxman! Oh, this is rich!

Nice to give these hapless dolts a badly-needed civics lesson.

And for God's sake, Maguire, send us some better trolls. These people are beyond pathetic...

Lady Sara

Should Congress send military police to the WH and conduct a perpwalk?

Can you tell me who in Congress has the authority to order the military to do anything? Just asking.

section9

Uh, Cleo, do you mind explaining where Congress was granted executive authority over the Military Police?

As Mike said, "that pesky Constitution"!

But in all seriousness, Rice is being held back because the Moonies are going to pressure King Henry to subpoena Condi. She'll come up there prepared for war, with briefing books and timelines. It will be embarrassing.

You have to understand Henry Waxman's function in the Democratic scheme of things. Think of Waxman as a protection racket. You give money, lots of it, to the DNC and the Clintons, and you avoid getting hauled in front of Waxman's Committee. Waxman runs a protection racket. He's going after Bush now, because that's popular. But later, Dems will use Waxman's committee to shake down contributors in private business. Oldest trick in the book

Unless, of course, Waxman can be dealt with. Rice is just the person to do it. She's much smarter and quicker than Waxman, and she is not intimidated by his bullying and screaming. So she'll ignore him until he makes the mistake of subpoenaeing her, then she won't show up to be deposed. Waxman won't allow Minority Counsel to be present at deposition, so she'll find ways to really piss him off.

She'll embarrass him, and Waxman will be abandoned by the minority, who will help out Condi. Watch, and learn.

Lady Sara

Via Drudge:

McCain heckled by CNN reporter Sun Apr 01 2007 13:50:38 ET

**Exclusive**

During a live press conference in Bagdad, Senators McCain and Graham were heckled by CNN reporter Michael Ware. An official at the press conference called Ware’s conduct “outrageous,” saying, “here you have two United States Senators in Bagdad giving first-hand reports while Ware is laughing and mocking their comments. I’ve never witnessed such disrespect. This guy is an activist not a reporter.”

Senators McCain and Graham flew into Iraq and drove into Bagdad, making stops at an open market and a joint Iraq/American military security outpost before appearing at the press conference.

This is not the first time Michael Ware has taken issue with Senator McCain’s comments about early progress in Iraq. Last week, after Senator McCain told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer that he needed to catch up on the news coming out of Iraq, Michael Ware responded, saying:

“I don't know what part of Neverland Senator McCain is talking about when he says we can go strolling in Baghdad.”

Michael Ware has also publicly expressed his views on the war last year in an interview with Bill Maher, saying, “I've been given a front-row ticket to watch this slow-motion train wreck … I try to stay as drunk for as long as possible while I'm here … In fact, I'm drinking now.”

Developing...


Semanticleo

"But I am surely no better informed after reading any of your hysterical recent entries here.'

Miracles are not part of my job description.

But it is good to know your Googleocity
has some functionality.

Semanticleo

"and the constitution directs that there he shall remain until January 20, 2009."

And your elementary math skills are extant,
PeterPuffer.

Semanticleo

".....decides to start treating the subject seriously."

Gotta love the self-parody.

Terrye

Lady Sara:

That does not surprise me. People have gotten to the place where they just plain do not want to watch the news.

That is the down side to constantly attacking the administration, eventually people just turn it all off. Depressing.

That is why issues like the price of gas matter. People are aware of it, they can not help but be aware of it.

roanoke

*Shoot* H-E-L-P-I'm having a memory problem.

Anyways-anyone know the one or two word term that essentially describes why we put the authority to conduct war in the Executive Branch-in order to escape the inefficiency and slowness of the Legislative Branch?

I was trying to descibe this and some brain came along and said-"Oh ya that's called smuckada huckeda."

So I said to myself-"I'll have to remember that!"

So of course a couple of months later all I can come up with is-"smuckada huckeda".

Whitehall

Why don't we just ask the French government if there were any yellowcake sales discussions with Iraq?

They own and operate the Niger mines! If the president of Niger had sold Saddam yellowcake, would the French have delivered and reported it to IAEA?

For an answer that is closer to the front lines, subpeona the chairwoman of Areva, not Condi. Of course Jacques Chirac, the guy who sold the Iraqis that research reactor and 10 fully enriched core loads, has some background too. French Intelligence also put out that fake fakery warning too.

One of my continual frustrations with media coverage, political posturing, JOM, and my fellow commenters has been a general disinclination to face the core issue. Libby's trial was a process failure, a personal tragedy, and a legal travesty but yellowcake can be life and death for millions.

Stop staring at the donut hole and start focusing on the donut!

Cecil Turner

Well, that should help Waxman get started.

Heh. Yep, that oughta help. My favorite was this bit by Waxman:

We continue to learn in a piecemeal fashion about other explicit wamings received by White House officials about this bogus claim. According to one recent press account, for example, CIA briefer Craig R. Schmall wrote a memo to Eric Edelman, Vice President Cheney's national security advisor, warning that the "CIA on several occasions has cautioned ... that available information on this issue was fragmentary and unconfirmed."
And, if we go to the WaPo article Waxman cites, it in fact says:
CIA and State Department documents show that analysts at both agencies became increasingly skeptical about the Niger allegation and tried to warn the White House. A memo from Schmall to Eric Edelman, then Cheney's national security adviser, recalled: "CIA on several occasions has cautioned . . . that available information on this issue was fragmentary and unconfirmed."
But if you go to that exhibit, you find the quote isn't in the memo, it's in the attachment. And that attachment was available to those who bothered to read the SSCI a few years ago:
On March 11, 2003, WINPAC drafted a current intelligence piece (SPWR031103-04) for the Secretary of Defense titled Iraq's Reported Interest in Buying Uranium From Niger and Whether Associated Documents are Authentic. The piece said "we do not dispute the IAEA Director General's conclusions . . . that documents on Iraq's agreement to buy uranium from Niger are not authentic." The piece also noted that the
[U.S. Government] . . . has cautioned IAEA inspectors that available information on this issue was fragmentary and unconfirmed and early last month told them, "we could not confirm these reports and have questions regarding some specific claims. Nonetheless, we are concerned that these reports may indicate Baghdad has attempted to secure an unreported source of uranium yellowcake for a nuclear weapons program."
It's worth noting that it's an after-the-IAEA-found-the-forgeries note . . . not some earlier warning to the White House. I'd like to think Waxman was merely confused, and not actively trying to use the WaPo's disinformation because it fit his agenda. But . . .

Cecil Turner

Gotta love the self-parody.

Really, Cleo, it's not that hard. Read the Constitution (and perhaps a couple of the pertinent Federalists) and get an idea of how the government is actually supposed to function. Then, when proposing oversight to correct the evils you see in every Republican official, you can make somewhat intelligent comments on how it should be conducted. It'll vastly enhance your credibility. (At the very least, absorbing concepts like the Executive as Commander-in-Chief will tend to reduce "Congress send military police" and similar gaffes.)

Lady Sara

Cecil: Re: military police. Maybe they are confused and think those "retired Generals" who wax poetic about how we still need large standing armies ready to drive a hole through the Iron Curtain or defend the Maginot Line can order the military police to mount a charge against the Commander-in-Chief.

SlimGuy

Waxman at one point in the Plame hearing said Dick Gregory was leaked to.

Maybe he can call Gregory and remove the duct tape.

Lady Sara

It seems to me that our trolls here advocate pulling ALL military resources out of the Middle East. This, of course, would necessitate closing all our Embassies and canceling all defense contracts we might have with any Middle East entities. I wonder if they realize that this makes them Buchananites? And do they realize the sacrifices they would be required to make as a result? Imagine if all defense contractors went out of business what would happen to our economy. Imagine what the price of oil would be and how limiting the lack of oil imports would be. And imagine what we, as individuals, would be required to do should another attack come along.

Of course, this is the troll goal -- pull the rug out from under the United States and turn us into a 3rd world country in one generation.

Patton

Rember the good old days when all good Democrats and Liberals insisted it was impostant for our leaders to lie to us, and to continue their lies for months on end, and to get their entire cabinet and their wife to come out and lie to us; and then when we are about to find out the truth, they go off and bomb some poor contry to oblivion.

Ahhh, that was the Democrats just 8 short years ago....

sferris

Straight Talk

BAGHDAD - After a heavily guarded trip to a Baghdad market, Sen. John McCain (news, bio, voting record) insisted Sunday that a U.S.-Iraqi security crackdown in the capital was working and said Americans lacked a "full picture" of the progress. The U.S. military later reported six soldiers were killed in roadside bombings southwest of Baghdad.

6 U.S. soldiers killed in Iraq bombings

sferris

More Straight Talk

"In the interest of presenting the full picture then, I think it should be pointed out that McCain and his fellow senators were accompanied to the market by a small army, upwards of 50 soldiers according to a source who accompanied the group on the stroll. Just another day at the market. And even though McCain cited a drop in violence, Agence France Presse on Sunday quoted an Iraqi official who reported a 15 percent increase in violence across Iraq in March. According to their tally, 2,078 civilians, cops and soldiers were killed last month, 272 more fatalities than in February.

In any case, it didn't take the insurgents long to send their reply. Less then 30 minutes after McCain wrapped up, a barrage of half a dozen mortars peppered the boundaries of the Green Zone, where the senators held their press conference. Though he was argumentative, McCain wasn't completely out of touch on Sunday. Admitting "we have a long way to go," the 2008 presidential candidate acknowledged that previous rosy assessments have been inaccurate. "I'm not saying 'mission accomplished,' 'last throes' or 'dead enders.'"

McCain's Sunday Stroll in Iraq's Capital

inmypajamas

Public attention to Washington inside baseball (with every detail dutifully related by the MSM) is a double-edged sword - yes, people will get annoyed with the constant show trials the Dems have planned but that public has to actually follow the shenanigans. Just how much of the population is currently following the judges mess, otherwise known as the Biggest Scandal of the Bush presidency? Exactly 8%, according to a poll I heard on the radio on Friday. That number seems to be entirely consistent with the results from the college survey cited above.

The reason we got saddled with these partisan game-players in Congress is that the American public wanted a "change" but they didn't have a clue about the details, about what actually would happen when these BDS hacks got power (remember how Pelosi disappeared for the last couple of weeks of the campaign?). Because they weren't paying attention. Again.

Cecil Turner

Actual coverage of Iwo Jima:

US troops have raised the Stars and Stripes over Iwo Jima four days after landing on the Japanese-held volcanic island. The 28th Regiment of the 5th Marine Division took Mount Suribachi at 1030 local time. [. . .]

Reporting from the US base in Guam, Admiral Chester W Nimitz said so far the battle had cost 5,372 casualties, including 644 dead, and that US carrier-based aircraft flying over the Bonin Islands north of Iwo Jima had destroyed three enemy planes.

If reported today:
"There is no way the Marines could have expected this. Someone got it all wrong. No one predicted this. This has been a horrible 24 hours for our country. This is a slaughterhouse. After all this fighting, Marines control only about a mile and a half of beach and the casualties are now over 3,500 and rising rapidly. We'd like to know what you think. Call the number on the bottom of the screen. Give us your opinions on these three questions:
1. Were the Marines properly trained?
2. Is this nothing of an island worth all these lives?
3. Has the president once again misled the American people?
(Final tally was 25,851 US casualties, including 6,825 KIA.) BTW . . . we won that one.

Other Tom

Ferris, I think the insurgents got mad because they found out we were using plastic grocery bags. Or maybe they were angered by the behavior of the progressive mayor Gavin Newsome. You know how those loony Mohammedans feel about drunkenness and adultery.

I'd love to have heard a clown like you on the subject of Gettysburg. They'd be holding slaves in the Confederate States of America to this day...

Other Tom

Cecil, I recognize that in the final analysis the congressional power to compel testimony is extremely limited. What I am wondering, however, is what sort of conventions and protocols have arisen over the past two centuries concerning executive cooperation. Personally, I think that the Democrats have already exhibited such bad faith that I would encourage Mr. Bush to instruct his people to ignore such requests altogether.

It would also be nice if he were to dress the Secret Service in brown shirts, outfit them with hobnailed boots, and have them fine-tune their practice of the hallowed goose-step. There are a number of moonbats who have been predicting a declaration of martial law ever since the Libby conviction, and it would be huge fun to watch them scurry.

Semanticleo

Really, Cecil, it's not that hard.

Truthfully, you exhibit the earmarks
of cautious curiosity which minimizes
fact error, but your narrow and constricted
style is further hampered by the ideological
bug up your ass (a different strain from my own). Add to that a stilted writing style which would benefit from some heuristic verve and some new nerve pathways, and you have the worst of both worlds; a robotic intransigence and human frailty. Not a good combination.

But keep reading the diverse selections you choose, by all means. But consider a creative writing course. It can only help.

MikeS

Iwo Reported today

After 2 days of bloody fighting on the tiny island of Iwo Jima, the Marines have run out of bullets. The Marines are retreating to ships off shore until Congress returns from vacation.

sferris

The meme that hearing are somehow going to be bad for Democrats is exactly working out. This last week has been a Republican train-wreck.

sferris

The meme that hearing are somehow going to be bad for Democrats isn't exactly working out. This last week has been a Republican train-wreck.

lurker

Oh yeah, it will eventually work out. The so-called Republican train-wreck will straighten itself out.

Now I see a few trolls talking to each other...with real JOM posters off enjoying their weekends.

Barry

Well, is it or isn't it?

Syl

Cleo

But consider a creative writing course. It can only help.

It's fine for one to laud creativity and artistry. It's quite another to presume these should be the basis for government policies.

I advocate the total separation of artists and state.

Cecil Turner

I recognize that in the final analysis the congressional power to compel testimony is extremely limited.

If the Dems had 67% of the seats, it'd be irresistible. With a razor-thin majority, it's less so. Still, if they're willing to play hardball (especially with the budget), the Administration would have to submit. Doesn't look too likely to me, at least on this issue. I suspect Condi will probably testify, though, and it'll be academic. I also don't think it matters if she does well, as it's unlikely she can overcome the reporting bias.

Truthfully, you exhibit the earmarks of cautious curiosity which minimizes fact error . . .

More to the point, I actually read the Constitution. (And re-read it on occasion.) Hence I don't remain confused about easily checkable government principles.

But consider a creative writing course.

If I were having to blame my ignorance on others, I could see the need. As it is . . . perhaps you should try a government course, instead.

Tom

THE TRAIN WRECK, OR, MORE PROFILES IN COURAGE

"SIOUX CITY, Iowa -- If President Bush vetoes an Iraq war spending bill as promised, Congress quickly will provide the money without the withdrawal timeline the White House objects to because no lawmaker 'wants to play chicken with our troops,' Sen. Barack Obama said Sunday.

"'My expectation is that we will continue to try to ratchet up the pressure on the president to change course,' the Democratic presidential candidate said in an interview with The Associated Press. 'I don't think that we will see a majority of the Senate vote to cut off funding at this stage.'"

As I have stated often and emphatically: The Surge will continue.

Other Tom

Once again, the "Other" part of my handle got omitted. That was such an enjoyable post, I had to claim full credit for it ASAP.

Other Tom

PROFILES IN COURAGE, PART DEUX

From Yahoo News:

"Congress and the White House remain in a standoff over whether Bush political adviser Karl Rove, former White House counsel Harriet Miers and other administration officials will testify in public about their roles in the firings. There appeared no signs of progress on Sunday."

They've authorized the subpoenas. Do they simply lack the courage to serve them? What on earth are they afraid of?

Shakespeare

"Truthfully, you exhibit the earmarks
of cautious curiosity which minimizes
fact error, but your narrow and constricted
style is further hampered by the ideological
bug up your ass (a different strain from my own). Add to that a stilted writing style which would benefit from some heuristic verve and some new nerve pathways, and you have the worst of both worlds; a robotic intransigence and human frailty. Not a good combination."


Please Semanticleo,this is the language of Shakespeare you are mangling.
Are you a robot?

Patton

Today in History:

Today Franklin Delano Roosevelt asked for volunteers to storm the beaches at Normandy. He cautioned that a large percentage of those troops will die before even getting on the beaches and thousands more will die attempting to get a foot hold in Europe.
In addition, as a good Democrat, he accompanied his call for sacrifice with a date certain to withdrawal from Europe and leave the people to Hitlers good graces.

He concluded his speech, with that famous phrase, the only thing we have to fear, well, is just about everything scares the bejesus out of me....

Patton

"""Sferries: The meme that hearing are somehow going to be bad for Democrats isn't exactly working out."""

have you looked at Congresses approval rating lately??

Poll: Approval Rating Of Dem-Controlled Congress Sinks To 28%
By Greg Sargent
The new Gallup poll finds that Congress' approval rating is 28%, down nine points from Gallup polls in January and February. Congress' disapproval is at 64% -- up nine from the previous months.

Other Tom

I have concluded that Cleo's IQ is less than 100, and it is therefore difficult for her to express herself coherently in writing. I would assume that her oral presentation, while undoubtedly halting, is a bit easier to comprehend, particularly if one is specially trained for that sort of thing.

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