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September 04, 2008

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Neo
An estimated 125 people were shot and killed over the summer. That's nearly double the number of U.S. soldiers killed in Iraq over the same time period. ... According to the Defense Department, 65 U.S. soldiers were killed in combat in Iraq. About the same number were killed in Afghanistan over that same period.

Perhaps Biden can come up with a plan to partition the city while we withdrawal all Americans ... from Chicago.

Porchlight

You all probably saw this other Rasmussen poll:

Palin more popular than Obama and McCain

Perhaps most stunning is the fact that Palin’s favorable ratings are now a point higher than either man at the top of the Presidential tickets this year. As of Friday morning, Obama and McCain are each viewed favorably by 57% of voters. Biden is viewed favorably by 48%.

There is a strong partisan gap when it comes to perceptions of Palin. Eighty-nine percent (89%) of Republicans give her favorable reviews along with 33% of Democrats and 59% of voters not affiliated with either major party.

I would say that wasn't a particularly strong partisan gap, but whatever - there is more tastiness:

The Palin pick has also improved perceptions of John McCain. A week ago, just before he introduced his running mate, just 42% of Republicans had a Very Favorable opinion of their party’s nominee. That figure jumped to 54% by this Friday morning. Among unaffiliated voters, favorable opinions of McCain have increased by eleven percentage points in a week—from 54% before the Palin announcement to 65% today.

....

Eighty-one percent (81%) of Republicans say that McCain made the right choice while just 69% of Democrats said the same about Obama.

hit and run

Me:
so they can call Sarah the world's biggest celebrity.

And so it begins...

Ed at Hot Air:

So suddenly has the momentum shifted that TPM claims Team Barry’s toying with the idea of abandoning its “ignore Palin” strategy and going after McCain over the fact that … Palin’s more gosh-darned popular than he is.

Extraneus

Here's the smackdown over the surge comments.

kim

Almost, (laugh back), but then I'd have to study. And worry.
==============================

PeterUK

BONTO
Barrack Omaba - Not the One.

kim

Omigod, that is just so tailspin, H&R; it will just accentuate that the Repubs have the Superstar in the wings.
====================================

GMax

You sound nervous........

Here I am my old nervous self to report that both the Dow Jones and the S & P 500 have swung to a slight uptick with less than 1 1/2 to go for the week. At worst this will be a push day up or down just a hair, but since closing out positions drives volume and prices I will stand by my call at this point.

DebinNC

Saw Texas Woman Kills Home Intruder With His Own Gun at Confederate Yankee and immediately thought "That's what Sarah would have done." If Obama's gun policy were in effect, would these people be facing charges? Do Chicagoans have the right to own guns for personal defense?

Charlie (Colorado)

You find what you're looking for. Thus liberals find defeat where others find success, and liberals find peace and love where others find only tyranny and misery.

I don't know how I missed it, but this is actually quite wonderful.

Charlie (Colorado)

Do Chicagoans have the right to own guns for personal defense?

Yes, but the Chicago police don't quite understand yet.

hit and run

OK, Team Obama's Next, Next Line of Attack: Sarah Palin doesn't represent middle American values. She is the highest ranking public official in a state with the longest coastline in the United States. She's nothing more than a coastal elitist.

Danube of Thought

SBW, Kaus was in my section in law school, and we were pretty good friends. He was very smart, and then as now he was an excruciatingly honest Democrat and liberal. He had been on the Harvard Crimson, and always wanted to be a journalist. He never practiced law for one nanosecond, as I recall. I think his journalistic integrity and honesty simply override his political preferences. Great sense of humor. I haven't seen him in over thirty years, but I've followed him in print, and he doesn't seem to have changed much.

Roger

I would beg to differ with you and the great majority of your respondents. Juan Cole and many others have looked at this issue in some detail. The consensus seems to be that the surge has been relatively successful as part of a much larger picture, but that the war is by no means over.

First, American commanders on the ground assess the gains as very tentative, perhaps to the point of being ephemeral. The reason for that is the lack of progress in establishing a body politic in Iraq. Iraq remains as fragmented as ever. Thus, the threat of civil war or other forms of instability (in the absence of the dampening effect provided by U.S. ground forces) appears to remain largely undiminished.

Moreover, even at its current reduced level, the level of violence remains astonishingly high - perhaps every bit as deadly as the Lebanese Civil War. As Cole put it, the Lebanese Civil War was one of the most violent civil wars in recent decades.

That is not to say that the surge has not had a salutary effect. Progress has been made. In particular, Al Qaeda (ironically not a factor in Iraq pre-war) is on the run (although probably not exterminated). And the surge was one component of the factors that made such progress possible (the others being the "Anbar Awakening" and similar political/noncombat developments).

The fact of the matter is that the current administration made a ghastly miscalculation in invading Iraq in 2003, and we (the U.S.) will be dealing with the consequences for many years. The current administration remains culpable for that blunder, as well as for its execrable efforts in prosecuting the war through early 2007.

Senator McCain's views on the Iraq War are virtually indistinguishable from those of the current administration. For that reason alone, he probably is the lesser of the two major presidential candidates (notwithstanding the fact that he is one of the two finest candidates for President since Eisenhower - the other, ironically, being Obama).

Danube of Thought

Obama's lengthy record of indecision reminds me of the way one guy paraphrased an old foreign-policy cliche to apply it to that of Jimmy Carter: "Agonizing paralysis at the time and place of our choosing."

Anybody know his LSAT score? Ever seen a transcript from either Columbia or Harvard?

Danube of Thought

Anybody who relies on anything Juan Cole has to say is off in the wrong direction from the start. A doctrinaire leftist and fool.

hit and run

DoT:
Anybody know his LSAT score? Ever seen a transcript from either Columbia or Harvard?

No, no Obama transcripts, though Leo was bleating for Sarah's transcripts yesterday.

Danube of Thought

A Juan Cole sampler:

" The most damning indictment of Cole, though, and the real reason he is this week's Jackass, is his bad habit of playing fast and loose with the facts. Cole likes to try to cover up his tracks when he is wrong (admittedly, a full-time job), seeming to forget that when you post something on the Internet, people may actually read it and remember what you said. This habit came to light recently when Cole made the incredible assertion that 9/11 was partially a response to the non-existent 'massacre' at Jenin, an Israeli military operation that took place in April, 2002."

For those not comfortable with arithmetic after the 0/0 stuff, Cole was attributing 9/11 to an event that occurred seven months later.

Danube of Thought

More Juan Cole, in words from his own mouth:

"...the wonderful folks over at Daily Kos, to whom I am most grateful for defending me, should please do up an oppo research diary on Martin Kramer. Who is he? Where did he come from?" (Kramer had publicly humiliated him over his imbecility concerning 9/11 and Jenin. For that offense, a little Oppo Research by the wonderful folks over at Daily Kos were in order.)

Publius

I'd like to see McCain emphasize the connectin between energy prices and the economy. Once that point is made the voters can decide who they blame for high energy prices.

I'd like to see McCain point out the inverse relationship of oil prices to the strength of the dollar. Once that point is made the voters can decide that it is monitary policies that are to blame for high energy prices.

GMax

So Juan has a time machine? Hey oppo this you moron!

fdcol63

Roger,

I disagree with your "ghastly miscalculation" statement, although I agree with some of your other points, especially about the tenuousness gains of the Surge and the dangers that still lie ahead.

I'm not sure it would change your opinion, but I wish you'd take the time to read the following article by Steven Den Beste. He's "just another blogger", not the "academic" that Juan Cole is (I share Danube's thoughts above", but he gives what I think was one of the best summaries of why we went to war and what was at stake that I've read anywhere.

Roger,

Although you've relied on Juan Cole as a source, always a mistake IMHO for the reasons that Danube of Thought mentioned above, thank you for one of the more coherent and reasonable anti-war statements I've seen here in some time.

I agree with many of your points, particularly those regarding the tenousness gains of the Surge and the dangers that lie ahead. But remember this saying:

Jane

Anybody who relies on anything Juan Cole has to say is off in the wrong direction from the start. A doctrinaire leftist and fool.

My thoughts exactly. No one has been more thoroughly discredited over and over and over than Juan Cole.

Sue

Sin(x)/x is 0/0 at 0 yet = 1

**Thump**

(That was me hitting the floor after fainting. Those things scare the hell out of me.)

fdcol63

Sorry ... I must have had something else copied to clipboard. Here's the link:

http://denbeste.nu/essays/strategic_overview.shtml

DrJ

OK, Kim (and Sue, if you are off the floor): here is one that applied math people (including engineers) enjoy: evaluate e^(i pi), where e (2.72..., the base of the natural logarithm) is raised to the power "i" (the square root of -1) times pi (3.14...).

Hint: the answer is very simple.

Caro

Sue, if we get injured in the fall we can go to L'Hospital.

JM Hanes

MarkJ:

"Oddly, this is precisely the trait that Democrats have been trying to tack on to GWB for years."

It's not the only one. You'd think he was actually channeling Bush here:

Look, it is not appropriate for somebody, who is one of two people who could be the president of the United States, to start tipping their hand in terms of what their plans might be with respect to Iran. It's sufficient to say I would not take the military option off the table and that I will never hesitate to use our military force in order to protect the homeland and United States interests.
It's Bush/Obama!

The only light between them in the following is Obama's inability to see (or his refusal to acknowledge) that Bush has been working closely with our European "partners" for years. Folks have also noticed that he never mentions that pesky Russian veto in the Security Council.

But where I disagree with you is the notion that we've exhausted every other resource. Because the fact of the matter is is that for six, seven years during this administration, we weren't working as closely as we needed to with the Europeans to create

What almost no one has explicitly pointed out, however, is that Obama's plan for dramatically reducing troops on the ground and reploying those who remain to safe havens from which they will emerge as needed to fight al Qaeda is almost precisely the same failed policy strategy that Bush and the military were pursuing before the surge.

Bush/Obama!

Charlie (Colorado)

The fact of the matter is that the current administration made a ghastly miscalculation in invading Iraq in 2003, and we (the U.S.) will be dealing with the consequences for many years.

Only in your dreams.

Come on, Roger: what are the bad consequences? Certainly we've had losses, wars are like that. But we've had fewer deaths in five years than the opponents predicted in the first three weeks. It's cost some money: so what? As I've pointed out on other occasions, if we can just keep average expenditures growing more slowly than average GDP growth --- something that has lots more to do with keeping control of the weenies in Washington than it does with a war that's clearly winding down --- we'll pay off the expenditures, and surprisingly quickly.

And for that, we purchased:

- a major interruption in the funding sources for islamic terrorism; whether Iraq was feeding money and support to al-Q per se, it was certainly funding Palestinian Hizbul'lah and al Fatah.

- we've broken the lines of supply at two places, isolating Iran.

- we've broken the AQ Khan network.

- we forced al-Q into a standing fight; we now have a situation where they've been utterly beaten and discredited among at least both Sunni and Shi'a in Iraq, and lost lots of support elsewehre.

- and we've liberated 50 million people from fascism.

The support you offer? Juan Cole, who is practically the definition of "objectively pro-fascist".

Charlie (Colorado)

Here's another hint: it's like Obama.

Captain Hate

The fact of the matter is that the current administration made a ghastly miscalculation in invading Iraq in 2003, and we (the U.S.) will be dealing with the consequences for many years.

That's an opinion, Roger, not a fact. Are you Joe Biden's sock-puppet because that seems like a gaffe he would make on a topic for which he'd consult a moron like Juan Cole. If so, you are gonna get sooooo smoked in the debates. Figuratively, although maybe in Alaska.....

boris

The miscalculation was expecting people who voted to invade to bahave honorably and support their decision rather than try to lie their way out of it.

ex-democrat

spot on, boris. and when we are safely out of the woods, that is a miscalculation that we should figure out how to avoid making again.

GMax

BTW as Cleo has the uncanny knack of predicting the opposite of what will happen, I will simply point out that both the DJIA and the S & P 500 indexes closed up today just like I predicted. Far from being right though, that makes me nervous or something according to this not even as good as a broken clock.

fdcol63

We're just 5 years into a major effort to CHANGE the culture of the Arab world so that we can co-exist with Islam, to spread a freer and more open form of government that would stem the tide of radical, militant Islam that had already sent 20,000 jihadists to terrorist training camps in Afghanistan after the US had spent considerable resources and diplomatic efforts on their behalf in Somalia, Quwait, Saudi Arabia, Bosnia, Kosovo, Chechnya, etc.

We're trying to change a culture that considers time in terms of decades and centuries.

Yet just 5 years into it, and some are impatient and consider it a failure.

Ironically, in their attempt to bash Bush, liberals make the same mistake they accuse "neo-cons" of doing:

They're disregarding the serious cultural differences between the West and Islam / Arabs, and trying to force Islam into complying with their own Western expectations of time schedules and instant gratification.

They also disregard the cultural differences concerning diplomacy, warfare, negotiation, dialog, and conflict resolution.

kim

DrJl, is the answer The One, or is it Zero?

Roger, you neglect Sistani, you ignore the fatwah against violence in Iraq, you denigrate the ongoing progress there and you segue unmercifally in the second half of your screed.
====================================

kim

Hah, I wrote that before I saw Charlie's note. I swear, you are trying to make me think. How would anduril handle it if I started doing that?
============================

kim

You gave it away with 'very simple'. It was either one of those two, or infinity.
====================

fdcol63

Quite frankly, it's only because of Chirac and Schroeder that we didn't get "full" Western European support for enforcing the UN resolutions and removing Saddam.

What would liberals be saying now, if de Villepaine and Chirac had not stabbed us in the back at the UN, or if Sarkozy and Merkel been in power at that time?

DrJ

Kim,

DrJ, is the answer The One, or is it Zero?

Darned close -- it is The Minus One.

(To show this, expand the exponential using Euler's formula,

exp(ix) = cos(x) + i sin(x)

Evaluate at x=pi; sin(pi) is zero; cos(pi) is -1)

JM Hanes

DrJ:

"Hint: the answer is very simple."
One man's simple is another's inscrutable.


Publius:

"I'd like to see McCain point out the inverse relationship of oil prices to the strength of the dollar. Once that point is made the voters can decide that it is monitary policies that are to blame for high energy prices."

Alas, most voters, like me, process such things only momentarily, at best. I understand string theory quite clearly when it's being explained to me, and twenty minutes later I couldn't explain it to anybody else if my life depended on it.


GMax:

"And if you know anything about the Unitarian Church, then you would know there is no more fertile ground for moonbats that are not into L Ron Hubbard or Karbala!"

I was reared as a Unitarian, but alas, Unitarianism as I knew it no longer exists outside of a few rare pockets like King's Chapel in Boston where it lingers in the zeitgeist.

DrJ

Maybe I should say, The Negative One.

BTW, L'Hospital is pronounced low-pee-tahl, with the accent on the last syllable. File in the department of useless information.

JM Hanes

PUK:

"Mesopotamia is probably a "Bridge too Far "for you."

If I had a blog and an audience, I'd steal that from you!

kim

Is it L'Hopital, with a circumflex over the 'o'?
===========================

kim

How about 'Cipher minus the One'?
=======================

DrJ

Is it L'Hopital, with a circumflex over the 'o'?

Depends on which math book I check. Two list it as "L'Hospital," with no diacritical marks. Another lists it as "L'Ho^pital," where the o^ is an o with a circumflex over it.

I can check further if you care. I only have another dozen or so math books. (This is probably a transliteration difference.)

Barney Frank

You know Leo, presumably there is a ferry where the bridge was to be. Improvement of a transportation network will benefit in either case.

Correct Kim. Sarah Palin has suggested improving the ferry service in lieu of the bridge. Fixing the road to the ferry hardly seems unreasonable; seems rather like all that infrastructure spending the goofs are always on about.

DrJ

Kim,

Accoring to the Wolfram web site (they make the symbolic math package Mathematica),

"Note that l'Hospital's name is commonly seen spelled both "l'Hospital" (e.g., Maurer 1981, p. 426; Arfken 1985, p. 310) and "l'Hôpital" (e.g., Maurer 1981, p. 426; Gray 1997, p. 529), the two being equivalent in French spelling.

Historically, this result first appeared in l'Hospital's 1696 treatise, which was the first textbook on differential calculus. Within the book, L'Hospital thanks the Bernoulli brothers for their assistance and their discoveries. An earlier letter by John Bernoulli gives both the rule and its proof, so it seems likely that Bernoulli discovered the rule (Larson et al. 1999, p. 524)."

see http://mathworld.wolfram.com/LHospitalsRule.html

Sue

Hint: the answer is very simple.

Hint: I'm back on the floor only this time, I refuse to get back up!

Sue

Here's another hint: it's like Obama.

Eww...I'm good at guessing answers...Zero! Am I right?

Sue

(To show this, expand the exponential using Euler's formula,

exp(ix) = cos(x) + i sin(x)

Evaluate at x=pi; sin(pi) is zero; cos(pi) is -1)

**Thump**

kim

Don't worry, Sue, there is no such thing as algebra. And if there were it would be Arabic.
===============================

kim

Guessing again, DrJ, but I'll bet the man spelled it with an 's'. The circumflex 'o' is, I believe, a convention of the French Academy, which postdates him.
======================================

DrJ

Sue,

This sort of math is surely arcane, but they are parts of very beautiful ways that one can use to describe the physical world. Not the world of politics, natch, but why molecules move to where they do (and how quickly they get there), why bridges hold up, or why one airplane wing works better than another.

Besides, you don't have to believe any of this nonsense. "i" (the square root of -1) is an imaginary number!

DrJ

The circumflex 'o' is, I believe, a convention of the French Academy, which postdates him.

Interesting. I will keep it in mind when the topic comes up in casual conversation. :)

PeterUK

DrJ

Where is the accent in Obama?

DrJ

In a place where the sun doesn't shine?

Sue

DrJ,

I would love for all of that to make sense to me. It doesn't and quite frankly it never will. I have come to the conclusion that it is like rhythm. You either have it or you don't. I have no rhythm either. ::sigh::

Sue

PUK,

I want to know where Obama's accent comes from. It is southern sounding but he never lived in the south.

DrJ

Sue,

That's surely fine -- we all have those areas where we find enjoyment. Thank goodness they differ.

I have come to the conclusion that it is like rhythm. You either have it or you don't. I have no rhythm either. ::sigh::

Well, that explains it! Music ability is strongly linked to math ability (really!). When I was a kid, I was a semi-finalist for the state-wide mathematics prize. All of the other ones in my area (there were a lot of us) were either in the symphony with me, or other musician friends.

(Please ignore the quibble that rhythm and music are different.)

DrJ

Sue,

To me Obama's accent sounds like a traditional black preacher. Listen to MLK -- you hear many of the same sorts of cadences and inflections; BHO tends to drop his pitch at the end of phrases more often. I would guess that he learned a fair amount of oratory from his church.

JM Hanes

DrJ:

I was going to say that you should put the simple answer on a yard sign, but I couldn't figure out which combination of symbols I should copy/paste to come out with -1!

DrJ

JMH,

Sadly, this is a result that mostly thrills sophomores in college. You would be surprised how often it got dropped at parties around the time of year when they learned it. (No, they were not the best ones.)

A comparable bumper sticker that made the rounds was "Honk if you passed P-Chem." That would be Physical Chemistry, which I thought was pretty easy because it was mostly math.

Sue

Just the name of the course scares the hell out of me.

Martin Luther King was from the south. If he is using King's accent, he has more personal problems than just an over-inflated ego.

DrJ

Sue,

I don't read it as an intentional copying of MLK's specific style. Rather, there is a powerful oratorical style that is used by black preachers. MLK is one of many. He probably studied that style, or came into contact with it at church.

Interestingly, there is a white counterpart; consider Billy Graham. The style is different, but they too predominantly have southern accents.

Sue

DrJ,

It bugs me. But I admit to being slightly biased and everything about him bugs me.

JM Hanes

DrJ:

You're quite right. Having lived so much of my life in the South, I recognized those cadences immediately. They come straight out of black pulpits, and I must admit I'm very partial to the style. It's often easy to discern who is/has been a preacher in ordinary conversation -- which is part of what suggest to me that it's an acquired skill in Obama's case. I don't fault him for it; it's a very effective oratorical style. He stops just short enough of a full embrace that audiences don't really understand precisely how they're being seduced. Services at AME churches, which someone mentioned earlier, are really lively affairs. I enjoy them myself, in part because everyone walks out the door feeling great.

Sue

Services at AME churches, which someone mentioned earlier, are really lively affairs. I enjoy them myself, in part because everyone walks out the door feeling great.

It's the food. And talk about an all day affair...but it's the food. ::wink::

PeterUK

Sue,
Of course you have rhythm,you have a heart,you walk,see where patterns emerge.

DrJ

JMH,

He stops just short enough of a full embrace that audiences don't really understand precisely how they're being seduced.

I noticed that too. His style clearly has these roots, but he pulls back just enough so that it is broadly acceptable. And so that it doesn't sound quite like the preacher, which probably would not go over that well for a presidential candidate.

I like the style too. For Obama's speeches, I kept waiting for the altar call.

Sue

PUK,

Thanks. I'll point that out next time I try to clap on the off-beat.

PeterUK

Sue,
Try counting it,Don't try to clap on the off beats try not to clap on the on beats.
One clap two clap.

Sue

LOL. You sound like my husband. Before he gave up.

PeterUK

Look Sue,"All God's Children have rhythm",it is just that in some it is more deeply hidden.
Just remember,when Bonto takes over you vill be clappink on ze off beat.

DrJ

Nah, Strauss had very strong down beats. Getting the next two to flow is the issue. What, we are not talking about the Waltz king?

TCO

Touting a minor drop in violence (for a country that still lacks ability to govern itself and requires 100,000+ US troops, plus our prestige and super techno weaponry to prevent civil war is not "success". This whole thing is fucked up nation building. I was for the war. But I was for smashing in there, hanging Saddam and then leaving. Not pacifying the natives. Bush lacks the balls to admit he's wrong. He's running out the clock. What a flop. Good men are dying. For a waste. War is about killing the enemy. not COIN bullshit.

DrJ

TCO, I think that train is long gone. Do you wish to wait for the next one?

JM Hanes

"But I was for smashing in there, hanging Saddam and then leaving."

Silly you.

DebinNC

JMH: "It's often easy to discern who is/has been a preacher in ordinary conversation -- which is part of what suggest to me that it's an acquired skill in Obama's case."

I think Wright's speaking style and the audience reaction to it captivated BO, and that's why he continued to receive sermon tapes during his Harvard years. I can imagine him alone in his room parroting Wright's inflections and crescendos.

Sue

Well, hell, Wright's from the northeast. What is it with all these affected southern accents?

DrJ

It just works for the style. Try saying "Ah have ah dream" vs. "Eye have a dream." Sort of like Italian opera vs. Germans opera. One just flows better than the other.

laura

Sue,
I read at some point in the last couple of years that even with mass media regional accents are still very distinct except for the black community. Regardless of geographical background blacks had the same speech patterns and accent. And that speech was a generally southern accent with certain distinctions that I can no longer remember.

JM Hanes

laura:

Some of that may well have to do with migration patterns. Most people would be amazed at how many folks in my part of North Carolina have close relatives in Detroit. There's still a stream of people traveling both directions for visits.

DrJ

Laura, JMH-

Interesting. I always wondered why blacks in East Oakland, East LA, Detroit, DC, Charlotte NC, Atlanta and Houston sounded very similar in dialect. I would have thought those out here on the left coast would have had different roots.

Publius

JMH:

"Alas, most voters, like me, proscess such things only momentarily, at best. I understand string theory quite clearly when it's being explained to me, and twenty minutes later I couldn't explain it to anybody else if my life depended on it."

You're right, of course. I'd like to say that if Congress can't understand that a weak dollar equates to high energy prices, how can we expect the voters to understand?

But I believe Congress does understand. They would just rather blame 'windfall profits' than tell the public that they are the bad guys.

Pofarmer

And for that, we purchased:

- a major interruption in the funding sources for islamic terrorism; whether Iraq was feeding money and support to al-Q per se, it was certainly funding Palestinian Hizbul'lah and al Fatah.

- we've broken the lines of supply at two places, isolating Iran.

- we've broken the AQ Khan network.

- we forced al-Q into a standing fight; we now have a situation where they've been utterly beaten and discredited among at least both Sunni and Shi'a in Iraq, and lost lots of support elsewehre.

- and we've liberated 50 million people from fascism.

The support you offer? Juan Cole, who is practically the definition of "objectively pro-fascist".

C'mon Charlie.

Ya left off two really plum ones.

The end of the Libyan nuclear program

and

The end of a major Uranium smuggling ring in the Congo(which happens to be in Africa).

There are lot's more benefits on the African continent, but I don't expect the nuanced Liberals to get that.

PeterUK

"What, we are not talking about the Waltz king?"

No,the Schmaltz King.

PeterUK

"This whole thing is fucked up nation building."

You must have a copy of "The Bumper Book of Nation Building".It behoves you to lend it to your nation.

Neo
In his new book, “The War Within,” Woodward now pretends the U.S. troop “surge” that President Bush ordered in Iraq was not the primary reason for the dramatic reduction of violence in that country over the last year, that it was the pre-surge troops and the Iraqis acting on their own.

Unfortunately for Woodward, his book comes out exactly as Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama broke from the Democratic orthodoxy and conceded that the “surge” worked.

DrJ

Boris,

See this for a dogfight:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAN0tglzris

The next one in the series is good too.

DrJ

Oops. Wrong thread.

sophy

I do not know how to use the wakfu money ; my friend tells me how to use.

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