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May 17, 2005

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SteveMG

Water cooler talk today centered on who would be the first person to propose that the leak to Newsweek was a deliberate deception intended to discredit the MSM.

My guess was that HerrDoktorProfessor Krugman would be the first to make the charge.

Wrong. Stormin' Norman Mailer beat the Krug' to the line.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/theblog/featuredposts.html#a001142

Dammed good James Jesus Angelton impersonation on the part of Mailer, no?

SMG

ed

Hmmm.

You can't cheat an honest man.

Pity there's so few in the MSM.

TM

Here is a transcript of Myers press briefing. The main story was BRAC.

http://www.defenselink.mil/transcripts/2005/tr20050512-secdef2761.html

Elrod

It's pretty obvious that the Newsweek report was the central trigger in the riots. But the Newsweek report would never have resonated across the Muslim world without Abu Ghraib and the well-documented abuses at Guantanamo. I think focusing so much on Newsweek's sloppy journalism is a bit of a smokescreen for the real issue of whether or not the desecration of the Koran, and similar activities, are actually occurring. Former detainees allege all kinds of things, but their opinion must obviously be taken with a grain of salt. The US has issued several blanket statements to the effect that nothing like this ever happens and it's against US policy. Well, of course. The problem is what happens on the ground, inside the interrogation room, not what official policy is. So I ask, is it that hard to imagine that there might be a Lynndie England or Charles Graner somewhere in Gitmo willing to use any means necessary to humiliate a prisoner? By all means, castigate Newsweek for running a story with a single anonymous source. But don't for a second think that it discredits the larger, systematic investigation - within and outside the US government - into abuses at US detention facilities.

Crank

Hard as I try, I can't get BRAC and BCRA straight. Myers was doing a briefing on McCain-Feingold?

Al

"And (b), looking back and knowing what we know now, how important do we think the Newsweek article was in sparking the demonstrations? This CNN article provides helpful background on that point."

Which CNN article?

Unhelpfully, nobody seems to be able to ask Gen. Eikenberry (wasn't she on LA LAW?) what s/he meant by that remark.

Cecil Turner

"By all means, castigate Newsweek for running a story with a single anonymous source. But don't for a second think that it discredits the larger, systematic investigation - within and outside the US government - into abuses at US detention facilities."

As opposed to, say, the Islamist practice of taking hostages and cutting their heads off? The one-sided coverage of this topic (with its ridiculous double standard) is a perfect demonstration of media bias in action. And for all the bloviating by liberals on the subject, there's about the usual amount of detainee abuse in US detention facilities . . . and most of the perpetrators have been court-martialed or are in the process of being charged. Meanwhile, abuse that's led to a handful of suspicious deaths (out of thousands processed) dominates the MSM, while Saddam's mass graves just can't seem to get any coverage. "Smokescreen"? I think "shoddy journalism" is a better bet.

TM

Which CNN article?

Good question. They must have gone to a commercial, but they are back now.

The one-sided coverage of this topic (with its ridiculous double standard) is a perfect demonstration of media bias in action.

Well, if the MSM spent time profiling the Iraqi families of those who died as the result of suicide bombings in Iraq or in Saddam's mass graves, it might (a) give us a sense that Iraqis view the US as a source of stability, thereby increasing support for the war; (b) inflame the US public against the terrorists in Iraq; and (c) force al-Jazeera to do its own investigative work into US abuses.

Or, it might not. Best not to find out. The public's "right to know" only includes its right to know when the Administration has (or might have) screwed up.

Knemon

Minor quibble: the acquittal of the *cops* in the Rodney King case ...

Tom Maguire

the acquittal of the *cops*

I have spent two days telling myself that I wrote "the acquittals in the Rodney King case", but I have not had the heart to look.

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