Powered by TypePad

« Drafting Doctors?!? | Main | That Was A Good Day »

April 05, 2020

Comments

Ignatz Ratzkiwatzki

--the factories couldn’t immediately respond due to physical limitations and lack of raw materials. The loggers can’t flip a switch and produce more wood--

I know a little about this but not to much.
IN CA it is largely impossible to log in winter because it's very wet and or snowy but it doesn't tend to freeze hard enough not to be a quagmire.
In know in Western Canada they log all winter and most of the summer but have to take a break during the spring thaw. Not sure about the east coast.
But in any case mills usually have a pretty decent inventory of logs on hand at the millsite either to tide them over for known seasonal interruptions of supply but also for unplanned ones.
There shouldn't have been a log supply problem yet and it only takes a week to get new crews in the woods [weather permitting] to start pumping out loads.
I would be surprised if log supply was the problem although like I said, pulp and paper not my niche.

DrJ

I found the discussion of the famous people met by JOMers to be very interesting. My collection, which I won't list, includes primarily academics -- including a Nobel laureate and one who was on the short list a few years ago -- major contributors, prize winners, and senior administration for some of the major Universities.

I also met and chatted with George Rathmann, who built Amgen and other biotechs. I invited him to a conference I helped to organize. There are a few other industry people.

The other main group is in music, as artists, recording engineers and as manufacturers.

The only politicians are the ones I've met on the flights to DC and back; that includes some CA congress critters who are not particularly noteworthy.

I'm happy with my non-glamorous life!

anonamom

buckeye, did your mom soak those diapers in borax in the diaper pail?
I hadn't given that a thought in about 57 years, I'm guessing. Youngest sib had Pampers.

Another Bob

“spending to increase manufacturing briefly doesn't make sense”

Excellent point Ralph. Didn’t immediately occur to me.

rich

>>>I really think it escaped from the Wuhan lab--and was not a deliberate bioweapon.

Posted by: clarice | April 05, 2020 at 04:00 PM<<<

i would think this would be a distinction without a difference. it would have to have been isolated and cultured in a lab environment first.

it brings to mind the sverdlovsk anthrax disaster ... the soviets discovered and cultured a naturally occurring, but very rare and deadly, anthrax strain; the personnel at the lab weren't following protocols; the soviets blamed it on a natural outbreak centered around a close by food market; the soviets got their assets in the us government, the arms control industry, and the media to quash anything about it because it was a gross violation of every convention and agreement regarding bioweapons.

they finally fessed up to it in the mid 90's and the western grandees they lead about by the nose never apologized to the people who were slurred.

Neo

This will all come out before the blue ribbon commission on the COVID-19 outbreak headed by Neil Gorsuch.

James D.

Late to the party but here’s my 10 famous folks I met and one’s a lie:

Lawrence Taylor
Val Kilmer
George Voinovich
George Frazier
Max Brooks
Jeff Sessions
George Burns
Ralph Macchio
Kent Conrad
Catherine Tate

(FYI, George Frazier was a pitcher for the Yankees in the early 80s and has the distinction of being one of only two pitchers to be credited with three losses in a single World Series)

cathyf

One of the things I've been amused by is how much advertising out there is incongruous because there is such a large lead up time. So TP, soap, hand sanitizer, etc are impossible to find, and yet the sale ads, Sunday paper coupons, etc. are still pushing you hard! That's because those all were printed up months ago...

Our local supermarket has "super-saver coupons". Every 4 weeks, we get a coupon book that has half the coupons good for the next two weeks and half good for the two weeks following. There is ALWAYS a toilet paper and/or paper towel coupon of some kind. When this started heating up at the beginning of March, the only TP that was sold out was the stuff on the coupon -- all of the other brands, and the other sizes of the coupon brand, had plenty. The next set, forget it, no TP of any kind. But today I went to the store and they had a half-dozen packages of the super-saver kind. AND I had the manufacturer's coupon from today's paper. I ended up with a $7 pack for $3!

But the other part of it is that I am a notorious TP and paper towel prepper. It all started with the local department store chain 6-7 years ago coming out with these spend-a-certain-amount-get-a-certain-amount-off coupons. Typically 20% -- so sometimes $5 off $25, $10 off $50, less often $15 off $75, $20 off $100. And less often, $10 off $30 or even $25. The very first time they did it, it was $10 of of $50 and it was right before Valentines Day, and the sales pitch was to splurge on something romantic for your sweetheart. So I checked out with my $50 in toilet paper, paper towels, dishwasher detergent, and joked with the checker that this was my "romantic" purchase. The checker came back with "it would sure be UN-romantic at MY house if we ran out of any of that stuff!"

So over the years I would be in the store buying something that I needed and I would need to add something to make it up to the coupon, and I didn't want to do the thing that the store wanted which is to buy something I really didn't need because it's basically free, right? Toilet paper and paper towels were an "we eventually WILL need this" choice. Well this store went out of business last spring, and in the months leading up to the closure there were a lot of coupons. And plus the grocery store would often have really good prices especially if you had manufacturers coupons.

So, yes, I came into the great covid-19 TP rush with basically a year's supply of toilet paper! Even with the two college students here it's at least 6 months! I don't actually need that TP that I got today... But it was fated that I would buy it, because WonderBoy says that there is no TP to be found in South Bend. And the case size for Girl Scout Samoas cookies turns out to be exactly the right size to put the 6 mega-rolls (=24!) pack on top of one box of Samoas, one Tagalongs, and two Thin Mints on the bottom of the box. 4lb 13oz, and it'll be there 2-day for $11.30!

rich

>>>Have you come up with a different or other theory? I agree it's an interesting thing.

Posted by: Extraneus | April 05, 2020 at 06:42 PM<<<

at the store i go to, i suspect it is about crowd control.

Captain Hate

they finally fessed up to it in the mid 90's and the western grandees they lead about by the nose never apologized to the people who were slurred.

Think the unfree press will ever admit lying steadily since at least as long ago as Watergate Vietnam Walter Duranty?

rich

ie the entire paper goods section is empty and hasn't been stocked in weeks. a decent supply of meat (larger cuts usually) and eggs have been available recently. canned goods are thin but available. produce looks good.

Porchlight

Love in the Time of Cholera

I really wanted to like that book but I couldn’t finish it.

Same. I got almost to the end and then something happened that made my eyes roll one too many times and I put it down forever.

clarice

https://www.theepochtimes.com/adam-schiffs-dereliction-of-duty-regarding-communist-china_3299388.html

rich

>>>Think the unfree press will ever admit lying steadily since at least as long ago as Watergate Vietnam Walter Duranty?

Posted by: Captain Hate | April 05, 2020 at 07:47 PM<<<

never.

Porchlight

There are two supply lines for TP just like for food: retail and commercial. No one is using commercial right now for obvious reasons. It's hard to get commercial TP into the retail TP stores. It's different paper, usually much more utilitarian, and much of it is in large size rolls. Same with commercial paper toweling which comes in big brown rolls or pre-folded for dispensers.

My little neighborhood convenience store has been selling single rolls of commercial paper (who knows where they got it, off a truck somewhere I guess). It's low quality and people aren't buying.

Dave (in MA)

Posted by: Ralph L | April 05, 2020 at 07:21 PM

Geezer Check

Porchlight

Geezer Check

Lol, Dave (and Ralph L).

I heard that in my teen daughters' voices.

rich

lol.

jimmyk

A fire at a Florida airport destroyed more than 3,500 rental cars

I’ll take insurance fraud for $800, Alex.

rich

should check to see how my hours are going to change for work tomorrow. woke up today and was horrified thinking it was monday already.

Stephanie Nene Not Your Normal Granma

A man mentions to a coworker that her smells nice today.
The woman suddenly grows enraged, storms into her supervisor’s office, and declares loudly that she’s quitting and has decided to file a sexual harassment lawsuit.
“Come on” says the supervisor, “what’s wrong with a guy saying your hair smells nice?”
“He’s a fucking midget!”

Pinandpuller

THE WORLD IS LAVA!!!

Ignatz Ratzkiwatzki

Why Nick Searcy’s Hollywood Project Battles a ‘Rigged’ System
Carolla, Prager reveal why the actor’s plan for a conservative Hollywood matters.

Another Bob

“ I’ll take insurance fraud for $800, Alex.”

Possibly.

But the cars were parked in a grass field.

rich

did someone spray gasoline on them?

henry

Ft Myers would have an excess of rental cars on site, given most are typically rented out. Florida does get wildfires. My brother complains about the smoke.

jimmyk

“woke up today and was horrified thinking it was monday already.”

I’ve had that confusion too. Comes from working at home every day. It’s hard to keep track of what day it is.

rich

Posted by: jimmyk | April 05, 2020 at 08:13 PM

thankfully i can still go into work. i've had a pretty bad bout of insomnia the last week or so.

Jane

Jimmy,

It was a forest fire that spread. That’s my semi-local airport.

Jane

Wait til you guys retire. You will never know what day it is,

Trump did a very optimistic presser. He (and we) appear to have turned the corner.

sbwaters

Finally, @realdonaldTrump calls out an @AP reporter who deserved it. He burned AP for asking wise guy questions.

MissMarple2

sbw,

Boy, did AP get it!

"What they have done is a miracle, delivering things to all the states. You should be thanking them, rather than asking wise guy questions!"

MissMarple2

sbwaters,


HA! GMTA!!

rich

Posted by: Jane | April 05, 2020 at 08:24 PM

i haven't looked at my 200.5k in a while (probably a 100.25k now) but suspect i'll be working well into my 70s.

Dave (in MA)

I liked the suggestion someone had yesterday that Trump should invoke the DPA and force the NYT and WaPo to churn out toilet paper instead of fake news.

Jane

Okay, time to lighten up. Name 9 places you have deep and one you want to go. Our job is to guess the wishlist: mine will be obvious ;

1. The Eiffel Tower

2, Normandy
3, Iceland
4. Melbourne
5. Prague
6. Sloviia
7. Hertsforshire
8. New Zealand
9. Listen
10. Montana

Jane

Listen = Lisbon

Jack Lillywhite

Capt. Eric says it was a landscape or woods fire out of control. If anyone would know it’s him.

Ignatz Ratzkiwatzki

Mirengoff with what I consider a good column at PL;
What about Singapore?

jim nj

https://www.stripes.com/news/middle-east/marines-coalition-forces-pull-out-of-iraq-s-taqaddam-air-base-1.624874

https://www.rudaw.net/english/middleeast/iraq/050420202
Half of US-led coalition troops to leave Iraq by end of 2020: PM-designate Zurfi

The coalition says these hand overs were planned all along. I'm sure they were, but I sense that the timetable was moved up a little.

It doesn't hurt that it makes it more difficult for Katib Hezbollah to target our forces. And things seem to have quieted down with the rocket attacks. I'm guessing we warned Katib Hexbollah that our next attack on them, if provoked, will not be proportional, but expansive.

Dave (in MA)

I don't think I've met enough famous people to make a list.

JM Hanes

Clarice:

Back from toiling in the great outdoors. Yes, the Times article you linked at 3;50 is the story I was thinking of. Many thanks, again! I think they did their best to make it sound like everything was hunky-dory, but there were some telling gaps in their coverage (emphasis mine):

The planes landed at Travis Air Force Base in California and Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Most of the 14 passengers who had tested positive were then flown to Omaha for treatment and monitoring by experts at the University of Nebraska.
Most could be as few as 8. Oddly enough, they don't say where the others went. Can't imagine why.

BTW, for other non-subscribers, I discovered a way to get around the Times demand that you create an account to read the whole article. I selected some of the visible text, and did a command-a to select all, which I then copied and pasted into a text document. It looks like you've only copied a paragraph and the the account message, but when you paste it into a document you get the whole thing. It can end up looking squirrely if you don't match the default style when you do the paste, though (command-option-shift v on a mac).

Tom R

The Dailymail article on the fired Navy captain is extremely bad optics for Trump. If the reports are true that the captain’s entire chain of command (the 1, 2,3, and 4 star admirals in esteem him and the SecNavy) were opposed to his firing then that is very telling.

On a related note, some interesting history on Teddy Roosevelt.

https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-navy/2020/04/04/theodore-roosevelt-captain-followed-in-footsteps-of-ships-namesake-by-writing-bombshell-letter/

rich

>>>Most could be as few as 8. Oddly enough, they don't say where the others went. Can't imagine why.<<<

i thought some went to McChord-Lewis just outside Tacoma.

Buckeye

buckeye, did your mom soak those diapers in borax in the diaper pail?

Sounds about right amom.

Same with me, I have a little sis 15 years younger. Cloth diapers were a thing of the past by then.

Buckeye

The Singapore experience points out the need for serological testing and effective prophylactic measures. We can’t shelter for a year or two.

Ignatz Ratzkiwatzki

--I don't think I've met enough famous people to make a list.--

I know I haven't and my life feels the richer for it.
Not many A-listers or Nobel prize winners out in the woods or on top of mountains.
Nor many at bed and breakfast inns on the coast either, though we did get to take Renee Russo's table in Eureka which was fine by us because the helicopters from filming the movie Outbreak were waking us every morning at first light.
I did have a chance to meet Milton Friedman but it would have entailed a trip into San Fran; sorry Uncle Milty.

I did meet the former CEO of Northrup. Seemed like a nice, singularly unhappy man looking for a mountain retreat to share with his kids who were growing up without him.
I may have mentioned before the somewhat funny but also sad prospect of his 10 or 12 year old son walking around everywhere on this beautiful mountain property with giant trees, streams and meadows and the whole time he's got a little button down coat on with a pencil and small pad taking notes on all the attributes of the place.
I kept thinking to myself "Jeebus kid, don't you want to throw a rock at a squirrel or go running across this meadow or stomp around in the creek?"
He just kept measuring the marigolds, while his old man was realizing too late, isn't what marigolds are for.

rich

Posted by: Buckeye | April 05, 2020 at 08:46 PM

bad news for the fearfactory.

my list is getting surprisingly long.

JM Hanes

jimmyk:

Someone may have already suggested this, but I noticed that Mark Steyn is doing a Steyn Club reading of Daniel Dafoe's Journal of the Plague Year which actually sounds like an interesting read.

Defoe_Journal_of_the_Plague_Year
I considered joining his club just to hear his rendition, but I decided I should probably just read it myself. I'll try to come up with a few non-plague related choices too.

Apologies for misattributing your comment about some folks' obvious interest in using the pandemic as a pretext for social engineering.

Ignatz Ratzkiwatzki

--the Times demand that you create an account to read the whole article--

Seems to me these arrogant media MFers have a lot of nerve not letting people read their schlock while demanding the rest of the country sacrifice and shut down.
How bout you stupid commie bastards do your part?

Dave (in MA)

https://josephsteinberg.com/covid-19-response-new-jersey-urgently-needs-cobol-programmers-yes-you-read-that-correctly/

Obsolete already even before Y2K, it's apparently still around.

Jack Lillywhite

Lackland ironically lacks a runway but is part of Joint Base San Antonio which has Randolph Air Base and Ft. Sam Houston as part of its structure.

Randolph has the runways, not Lackland.

Jack Lillywhite

COBOL? Finally someone asks me about something I know in computer science. Do I get dedicated key punch machine?

Neo

Just In:

COVID-19 Response: New Jersey Urgently Needs COBOL Programmers (Yes, You Read That Correctly).

anonamom

know COBOL? New Jersey needs YOU!

https://josephsteinberg.com/covid-19-response-new-jersey-urgently-needs-cobol-programmers-yes-you-read-that-correctly/

clarice

I'm starting to feel like I'm stuck in a sod house on the prairie , stirring gruel over a small fire.I don't think God really meant for husbands and wives to share 3 meals a day forever.It's just not natural. And when we're both together all day doing the same things in separate offices, there's not enough to talk about for one meal let alone three. what did they discuss in sod huts? Wind is a bit up today? The snow drifts haven't completely blocked the door and windows? Are we out of firewood again and will amazon deliver in it?

Dave (in MA)

I was a COBOL programmer for a greeting card company when I was in school.

lyle

I don't think I've met enough famous people to make a list.

Nor have I. Fame doesn’t impress me, though. Especially fame from being an actor/actress or anyone involved in Hollywood.

lyle

https://www.amgreatness.com/2020/04/04/what-a-year-the-coronavirus-crisis-in-retrospect/

Kimball.

Neo

A friend works for an insurance company that had their actuaries done on a old computer which used COBOL. Over the years they invested in interfaces to the old computer to keep it going.
Eventually, they finally decided to look at the COBOL and pick out the formulas required to move it to a modern desktop .. much to the amazement of the IT dept

bubarooni

My closest brush to a 'famous' person who is not named Bob Knight...

I'm reading a book in the airport at Salt Lake City on a layover.

I look up from my book, and across from me in a chair is a ruggedly handsome looking dude with a smokeshow sitting next to him.

He looks up at me, and I think 'That's the dude from Starship Troopers!'

He get's a pained look as he definitely realizes I've ID'd him.

I tip my head towards him and he does likewise.

I go back to reading my book.

I think he was genuinely relieved I didn't ask for an autograph or otherwise engage with him.

Ignatz Ratzkiwatzki

From Doc Murray's FAQ;

Will we need social distancing until there is a vaccine?

Our model suggests that, with social distancing, the end of the first wave of the epidemic could occur by early June. The question of whether there will be a second wave of the epidemic will depend on what we do to avoid reintroducing COVID-19 into the population. By the end of the first wave of the epidemic, an estimated 97% of the population of the United States will still be susceptible to the disease and thus measures to avoid a second wave of the pandemic prior to vaccine availability will be necessary. Maintaining some of the social distancing measures could be supplemented or replaced by nation-wide efforts such as mass screening, contact tracing, and selective quarantine.


The time is rapidly approaching, especially if some of the countries ahead of us flare up again, that people will just say "Eff it. Geezers? Lock yourself up. We're going back to work."

Dave (in MA)

One of the short list of famous people I did meet was a 'dude from Starship Trooper'.

Neo

Casper Van Dien ?

Stephanie Nene Not Your Normal Granma

This is long but interesting:
Covid-19 had us all fooled, but now we might have finally found its secret.
libertymavenstock
libertymavenstock
Follow
Apr 4 · 8 min read

In the last 3–5 days, a mountain of anecdotal evidence has come out of NYC, Italy, Spain, etc. about COVID-19 and characteristics of patients who get seriously ill. It’s not only piling up but now leading to a general field-level consensus backed up by a few previously little-known studies that we’ve had it all wrong the whole time. Well, a few had some things eerily correct (cough Trump cough), especially with Hydroxychloroquine with Azithromicin, but we’ll get to that in a minute.
There is no ‘pneumonia’ nor ARDS. At least not the ARDS with established treatment protocols and procedures we’re familiar with. Ventilators are not only the wrong solution, but high pressure intubation can actually wind up causing more damage than without, not to mention complications from tracheal scarring and ulcers given the duration of intubation often required… They may still have a use in the immediate future for patients too far to bring back with this newfound knowledge, but moving forward a new treatment protocol needs to be established so we stop treating patients for the wrong disease.
The past 48 hours or so have seen a huge revelation: COVID-19 causes prolonged and progressive hypoxia (starving your body of oxygen) by binding to the heme groups in hemoglobin in your red blood cells. People are simply desaturating (losing o2 in their blood), and that’s what eventually leads to organ failures that kill them, not any form of ARDS or pneumonia. All the damage to the lungs you see in CT scans are from the release of oxidative iron from the hemes, this overwhelms the natural defenses against pulmonary oxidative stress and causes that nice, always-bilateral ground glass opacity in the lungs. Patients returning for re-hospitalization days or weeks after recovery suffering from apparent delayed post-hypoxic leukoencephalopathy strengthen the notion COVID-19 patients are suffering from hypoxia despite no signs of respiratory ‘tire out’ or fatigue.
Here’s the breakdown of the whole process, including some ELI5-level cliff notes. Much has been simplified just to keep it digestible and layman-friendly.
Your red blood cells carry oxygen from your lungs to all your organs and the rest of your body. Red blood cells can do this thanks to hemoglobin, which is a protein consisting of four “hemes”. Hemes have a special kind of iron ion, which is normally quite toxic in its free form, locked away in its center with a porphyrin acting as it’s ‘container’. In this way, the iron ion can be ‘caged’ and carried around safely by the hemoglobin, but used to bind to oxygen when it gets to your lungs.
When the red blood cell gets to the alveoli, or the little sacs in your lungs where all the gas exchange happens, that special little iron ion can flip between FE2+ and FE3+ states with electron exchange and bond to some oxygen, then it goes off on its little merry way to deliver o2 elsewhere.
Here’s where COVID-19 comes in. Its glycoproteins bond to the heme, and in doing so that special and toxic oxidative iron ion is “disassociated” (released). It’s basically let out of the cage and now freely roaming around on its own. This is bad for two reasons:
1) Without the iron ion, hemoglobin can no longer bind to oxygen. Once all the hemoglobin is impaired, the red blood cell is essentially turned into a Freightliner truck cab with no trailer and no ability to store its cargo.. it is useless and just running around with COVID-19 virus attached to its porphyrin. All these useless trucks running around not delivering oxygen is what starts to lead to desaturation, or watching the patient’s spo2 levels drop. It is INCORRECT to assume traditional ARDS and in doing so, you’re treating the WRONG DISEASE. Think of it a lot like carbon monoxide poisoning, in which CO is bound to the hemoglobin, making it unable to carry oxygen. In those cases, ventilators aren’t treating the root cause; the patient’s lungs aren’t ‘tiring out’, they’re pumping just fine. The red blood cells just can’t carry o2, end of story. Only in this case, unlike CO poisoning in which eventually the CO can break off, the affected hemoglobin is permanently stripped of its ability to carry o2 because it has lost its iron ion. The body compensates for this lack of o2 carrying capacity and deliveries by having your kidneys release hormones like erythropoietin, which tell your bone marrow factories to ramp up production on new red blood cells with freshly made and fully functioning hemoglobin. This is the reason you find elevated hemoglobin and decreased blood oxygen saturation as one of the 3 primary indicators of whether the shit is about to hit the fan for a particular patient or not.
2) That little iron ion, along with millions of its friends released from other hemes, are now floating through your blood freely. As I mentioned before, this type of iron ion is highly reactive and causes oxidative damage. It turns out that this happens to a limited extent naturally in our bodies and we have cleanup & defense mechanisms to keep the balance. The lungs, in particular, have 3 primary defenses to maintain “iron homeostasis”, 2 of which are in the alveoli, those little sacs in your lungs we talked about earlier. The first of the two are little macrophages that roam around and scavenge up any free radicals like this oxidative iron. The second is a lining on the walls (called the epithelial surface) which has a thin layer of fluid packed with high levels of antioxidant molecules.. things like abscorbic acid (AKA Vitamin C) among others. Well, this is usually good enough for naturally occurring rogue iron ions but with COVID-19 running rampant your body is now basically like a progressive state letting out all the prisoners out of the prisons… it’s just too much iron and it begins to overwhelm your lungs’ countermeasures, and thus begins the process of pulmonary oxidative stress. This leads to damage and inflammation, which leads to all that nasty stuff and damage you see in CT scans of COVID-19 patient lungs. Ever noticed how it’s always bilateral? (both lungs at the same time) Pneumonia rarely ever does that, but COVID-19 does… EVERY. SINGLE. TIME.

MissMarple2

I used cloth diapers until my son and I got back to the States from Germany back in 1969.
The Pampers I used required using a diaper pin (no tape).

The disposables were a BIG improvement. No need for plastic pants, no diaper rash.

I had forgotten all about using cloth diapers until it was brought up here!

jim nj

https://thehill.com/policy/international/middle-east-north-africa/491248-low-risk-activities-to-resume-in-iran-on-april

'Low-risk' activities to resume in Iran on April 11, Rouhani says

Iran is ready to take the plunge. They may have built up some herd immunity by now.

Porchlight

clarice, lack of conversation topics is definitely a problem.

We had our second family Zoom this evening and no one could keep the topic much off the obvious.

Mr Porch and I have been watching Band Of Brothers for some perspective, and I've been reading my usual cookbooks and mystery novels with a renewed vigor.

I have a second Zoom happy hour with my close college friends tomorrow. All libs addicted to doom porn - though my two former roommates in the private sector have at least a semblance of an idea that this shutdown can't go on much longer.

Another former roommate in Portland works for Ron Wyden. Can you imagine?

Stephanie Nene Not Your Normal Granma

Once your body is now running out of control, with all your oxygen trucks running around without any freight, and tons of this toxic form of iron floating around in your bloodstream, other defenses kick in. While your lungs are busy with all this oxidative stress they can’t handle, and your organs are being starved of o2 without their constant stream of deliveries from red blood cell’s hemoglobin, and your liver is attempting to do its best to remove the iron and store it in its ‘iron vault’. Only its getting overwhelmed too. It’s starved for oxygen and fighting a losing battle from all your hemoglobin letting its iron free, and starts crying out “help, I’m taking damage!” by releasing an enzyme called alanine aminotransferase (ALT). BOOM, there is your second of 3 primary indicators of whether the shit is about to hit the fan for a particular patient or not.
Eventually, if the patient’s immune system doesn’t fight off the virus in time before their blood oxygen saturation drops too low, ventilator or no ventilator, organs start shutting down. No fuel, no work. The only way to even try to keep them going is max oxygen, even a hyperbaric chamber if one is available on 100% oxygen at multiple atmospheres of pressure, just to give what’s left of their functioning hemoglobin a chance to carry enough o2 to the organs and keep them alive. Yeah we don’t have nearly enough of those chambers, so some fresh red blood cells with normal hemoglobin in the form of a transfusion will have to do.
The core point being, treating patients with the iron ions stripped from their hemoglobin (rendering it abnormally nonfunctional) with ventilator intubation is futile, unless you’re just hoping the patient’s immune system will work its magic in time. The root of the illness needs to be addressed.
Best case scenario? Treatment regimen early, before symptoms progress too far. Hydroxychloroquine (more on that in a minute, I promise) with Azithromicin has shown fantastic, albeit critics keep mentioning ‘anecdotal’ to describe the mountain, promise and I’ll explain why it does so well next. But forget straight-up plasma with antibodies, that might work early but if the patient is too far gone they’ll need more. They’ll need all the blood: antibodies and red blood cells. No help in sending over a detachment of ammunition to a soldier already unconscious and bleeding out on the battlefield, you need to send that ammo along with some hemoglobin-stimulant-magic so that he can wake up and fire those shots at the enemy.
The story with Hydroxychloroquine
All that hilariously misguided and counterproductive criticism the media piled on chloroquine (purely for political reasons) as a viable treatment will now go down as the biggest Fake News blunder to rule them all. The media actively engaged their activism to fight ‘bad orange man’ at the cost of thousands of lives. Shame on them.How does chloroquine work? Same way as it does for malaria. You see, malaria is this little parasite that enters the red blood cells and starts eating hemoglobin as its food source. The reason chloroquine works for malaria is the same reason it works for COVID-19 — while not fully understood, it is suspected to bind to DNA and interfere with the ability to work magic on hemoglobin. The same mechanism that stops malaria from getting its hands on hemoglobin and gobbling it up seems to do the same to COVID-19 (essentially little snippets of DNA in an envelope) from binding to it. On top of that, Hydroxychloroquine (an advanced descendant of regular old chloroquine) lowers the pH which can interfere with the replication of the virus. Again, while the full details are not known, the entire premise of this potentially ‘game changing’ treatment is to prevent hemoglobin from being interfered with, whether due to malaria or COVID-19.
No longer can the media and armchair pseudo-physicians sit in their little ivory towers, proclaiming “DUR so stoopid, malaria is bacteria, COVID-19 is virus, anti-bacteria drug no work on virus!”. They never got the memo that a drug doesn’t need to directly act on the pathogen to be effective. Sometimes it’s enough just to stop it from doing what it does to hemoglobin, regardless of the means it uses to do so.
Anyway, enough of the rant. What’s the end result here? First, the ventilator emergency needs to be re-examined. If you’re putting a patient on a ventilator because they’re going into a coma and need mechanical breathing to stay alive, okay we get it. Give ’em time for their immune systems to pull through. But if they’re conscious, alert, compliant — keep them on O2. Max it if you have to. If you HAVE to inevitably ventilate, do it at low pressure but max O2. Don’t tear up their lungs with max PEEP, you’re doing more harm to the patient because you’re treating the wrong disease.
Ideally, some form of treatment needs to happen to:
Inhibit viral growth and replication. Here plays CHQ+ZPAK+ZINC or other retroviral therapies being studies. Less virus, less hemoglobin losing its iron, less severity and damage.
Therapies used for anyone with abnormal hemoglobin or malfunctioning red blood cells. Blood transfusions. Whatever, I don’t know the full breadth and scope because I’m not a physician. But think along those lines, and treat the real disease. If you’re thinking about giving them plasma with antibodies, maybe if they’re already in bad shape think again and give them BLOOD with antibodies, or at least blood followed by plasma with antibodies.
Now that we know more about how this virus works and affects our bodies, a whole range of options should open up.
Don’t trust China. China is ASSHOE. (disclaimer: not talking about the people, just talking about the regime). They covered this up and have caused all kinds of death and carnage, both literal and economic. The ripples of this pandemic will be felt for decades.
Fini.

Dave (in MA)

When my mother-in-law would cook tripe for my wife's stepfather the smell reminded me of the diaper pail from when my younger siblings were babies.

bubarooni

Cobol was the first programming language I learned.

This was about '97 and the version we learned on was run off a CD in a personal computer.

When I'd screw up a line. No need to wait, I'd rewrite and just do it again till it was right.

My instructor, a full prof at I.U., told me that was cheating and I should put more thought in the code before I executed it because back in the old days you might not get another shot on the mainframe for a week.

He also thought GOTO would be the death of me...

Ignatz Ratzkiwatzki

Hinderaker;
Data Suggest Masks Matter, Tests Don’t

Perhaps these experts should look harder at the actual data, and not just their models. The data certainly suggests more testing may not be our savior. Alternatively, the Trump Administration should consider asking Governors to mandate, not suggest, that their citizens wear face masks in public. South Korea’s and Japan experience suggests that combining this policy with one that more surgically isolated the elderly and most vulnerable while allowing most of the country to go back to work, would provide more effective protection from the virus and at a far, far lower cost.

Welp, I figure we're going to be told we have to wear masks in 3...2...1...
I guess it would be worth it if the rest of his suggestions were taken but I doubt they will be.

Dave (in MA)
When I'd screw up a line. No need to wait, I'd rewrite and just do it again till it was right.
Luxury!
Porchlight

Our model suggests that, with social distancing, the end of the first wave of the epidemic could occur by early June.

Fuck that shit. China Lung AIDS will peak and fade well before that.

Porchlight

Mom used cloth diapers for my older brother (born 1967) and me (born 1969). When my younger brother was born in 1971, she switched to Pampers. In part because they were more available, and in part because my dad said they could afford it.

But those old cloth diapers remained in the rag bag all through my childhood, and my dad swore they were the best rags ever.

Porchlight

BTW I never considered using cloth diapers for my own kids, but my eco-minded friends did. For their FIRST kids only, lol.

bubarooni

I googled the name Neo, that's definitely the dude.

Jack Lillywhite

Off to slumberland but like all things Trump, I like an Easter terminus👍😛

Jane

I have met a lot more famous people than on my list, but certainly not by choice - but chance . None of them but Red, and maybe the short guy in the James Bond movies particularly moved me. They are just people like everyone else. Some of them think they are important, and some of them think they are just people. Those are the interesting ones.

Buckeye

Bubarooni

There are lots of online compilers for most languages. Feeling nostalgic?

Maybe GOTO won’t getcha:)

DrJ

Maybe GOTO won’t getcha:)

Hey, I started with FORTRAN 66, so this is trivial. Does COBOL have a computed GOTO? :)

Dave (in MA)

Procedure Division.


That's about all I remember.

jimmyk

The data certainly suggests more testing may not be our savior.

Maybe I'm missing something, but that Hinderaker piece seems really dumb, looking at correlation seemingly without realizing that the causation is running both ways. Of course countries that test more have a higher death rate. Because symptoms trigger testing. They're not just randomly testing people.

Porchlight

I just erased some brain cells on Twitter reading how some feminists are calling "Karen" a slur and some liberals are saying Karens are all Trump voters and black women are saying that white women, feminist or not, shouldn't complain about being called Karens while black people are being arrested for breathing.

All the Karens I know are liberal (mostly white) women who are currently calling 911 - or at least bitching - because they see neighbors outside who are supposed to be in home detention.

If you're not familiar with the term: https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Karen

Ignatz Ratzkiwatzki

That was very interesting stuff, Steph.
I wonder how much of it's correct. Whoever it was said they're not a doc. What is he/she?

Porchlight

They're not just randomly testing people.

I thought South Korea has done massive testing on pretty much anyone - symptomatic, asymtomatic, recovered, etc. That's why their mortality rate is lower.

Everyone else is waiting until symptoms to test and then waiting for the test results and that doesn't lead anywhere good.

I think anyone with symptoms should be prescribed HCQ/Zpack immediately. Let's keep outpatients from becoming inpatients.

sbwaters

He also thought GOTO would be the death of me

As it should be. Difficult to validate code that uses a GOTO.

Ignatz Ratzkiwatzki

--Maybe I'm missing something, but that Hinderaker piece seems really dumb, looking at correlation seemingly without realizing that the causation is running both ways.--

He did have some mask use correlation problems but his point on testing was there seemed to be no actual correlation between testing and effectively suppressing the bug because Japan hardly tests anyone and SK which has tested tons have both kept a lid on it.

MissMarple2

Jane,

I have met very few famous people, mostly because hardly anyone comes through here.

Here's my list:

Tony Randall
Ashley Montague
Jesse Owens
Dan Burton

All four were met because I was the president of the Student Council my freshman year in Middle School, and I was in charge of greeting convocation speakers.

Other than that - no one.

Dave (in MA)

Porch, the person I know who best fits that stereotype actually is named Karen. The last time we went out to eat together she was pestering the waiter about whether the dishes she was ordering for her kids had gluten in them, because all that gluten isn't good for kids. Another person at the table-who actually has celiac disease-looked at me and gave me an eye-roll.

Catsmeat

Hi, Jack--No, I really met Howard Cosell--came to Vanderbilt to give a talk. But not Beverley Sills, though that would have been fun. And I forgot that I served Robert Penn Warren his first slice of his 80th birthday cake (his daughter Rosanna was teaching at Vanderbilt then and we were friends).

Camus' The Plague I know well and have taught, but I wouldn't read it again unless someone was offering me serious money--it is very, very painful and Camus has the Christian point of view expressed just so he can beat up on it.

GUS

I may be late to the party Buckeye, but.

Stranded, stranded on the toilet bowl.
What do you do when you're stranded, and you don't have a roll.
Just to prove you're a man you must wipe it with your hand....
Etc etc etc.

Stephanie Nene Not Your Normal Granma

IDK it came from libertymavenstock and got posted on FB but seems to have been excepted from Medium

Ignatz Ratzkiwatzki

There's not a huge difference between SK and Japan's mortality rates.
SK is at 1.8% with all their testing.
Japan is at 2.5% with much less testing per capita.

sbwaters

Steph, that thesis would be easily tested and could ease the shortage of ventilators.

Another tweet suggests teh symptoms mimic high altitude oxygen deprivation. That would match the thesis you present.

Pinandpuller

No lie, I saw a guy in a flannel snowmobile mask today.

This is far beyond parody now.

Pinandpuller

Catsmeat

I bet you were a cute little monkey too.

MissMarple2

Video clip from the news conference. about a minute.

pic.twitter.com/hUVUJb9zSA

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 6, 2020
bubarooni

No doubt about that sbwaters, but... when you write the code it always makes perfect sense to you. It's the schlub 3 years later trying to figure out your logic who's in a pinch.

Imagine my delight when I actually had to code in VB6 for real and my old crutch was there. I left lots of comments though!

rem i couldn't figure out another way to do it...

Only thing I program these days are firewalls, routers and switches and even that is getting few and far between.

I do code all the I.T. related bills for accounting every month but that's a different kind of coding.

MissMarple2

Another video clip from the press conference. One minute.

pic.twitter.com/hUVUJb9zSA

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 6, 2020

The comments to this entry are closed.

Wilson/Plame